EW 102: A Second Course in Electronic Warfare

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Artech House, 2004 - Technology & Engineering - 274 pages
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Serving as a continuation of the bestselling book EW 101: A First Course in Electronic Warfare, this new volume is a second installment of popular tutorials featured in the Journal of Electronic Defense. Without delving into complex mathematics, this book gives engineers, defense contractors, managers, and government procurers a basic working knowledge of the technologies deployed in today's electronic warfare (EW) systems. Organized into chapters with new introductory and supplementary material from the author, this unique book includes tutorials on radar characteristics, infrared and electro-optical systems, signal jamming, spectrum spreading, satellite communications, and emitter location systems. A thorough and challenging problem set for each class of EW technology covered in the book, complete with solutions, helps readers to evaluate EW systems and their applications.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
11 Generalities About EW
3
12 Information Warfare
5
13 How to Understand Electronic Warfare
6
Threats
9
212 Radars Versus Communication
10
214 RadarGuided Weapons
11
Guided Weapons
12
533 TwoRay Propagation
114
534 KnifeEdge Propagation
116
55 Background Noise
120
56 Digital Communication
121
561 Digital Signals
122
563 Digitizing Imagery
124
564 Digital Signal Format
125
565 RF Modulations for Digital Signals
126

218 Radar Resolution Cell
13
23 Threat Guidance Approaches
15
232 Semiactive Guidance
16
234 Passive Guidance
17
242 Antenna Beamwidth
18
243 Antenna Beam Pointing
19
25 Modulation Characteristics of Threat Radars
22
252 Pulse Doppler Radars
25
254 Threat Radar Applications
26
261 The Nature of Communication Signals
27
263 Digital Data Links
29
264 Satellite Links
30
Radar Characteristics
33
311 Types of Radars
34
312 Basic Radar Block Diagrams
35
32 Radar Range Equation
36
321 Radar Cross Section
39
322 Radar Detection Range
40
33 Detection Range Versus Detectability Range
42
331 Estimating the Sensitivity of the Radar Receiver
43
332 Example of Radar Detection Range Calculation
44
34 Radar Modulation
48
351 Unintentional Modulation on Pulses
50
352 Pulse Compression
51
354 Digital Modulation on Pulses
53
36 CW and Pulse Doppler Radars
54
361 Doppler Shift
55
362 CW Radar
56
364 Pulse Doppler Radar
58
371 Basic MTI Operation
59
372 MTI Data Rates
61
373 Airborne Moving Target Indicator AMTI Radar
62
38 Synthetic Aperture Radars
63
382 Azimuth Resolution
64
383 Focused Array SAR
66
39 Low Probability of Intercept Radars
67
392 Levels of LPI
68
394 Detection Versus Detectability
70
395 LPI Figure of Merit
71
396 Other Factors Impacting Detection Range
72
Infrared and ElectroOptical Considerations in Electronic Warfare
77
411 Infrared Spectrum
78
412 Blackbody Radiation
79
413 IR Transmission
80
415 ElectroOptical Devices
82
422 IR Missiles
83
43 IR Line Scanners
87
44 Infrared Imagery
90
442 IR Imagery Tracking
93
45 NightVision Devices
94
452 Classical Night Operations
95
454 Spectral Response
96
46 Laser Target Designation
98
462 Laser Warning
99
463 Countermeasures Against LaserHoming Missiles
100
47 Infrared Countermeasures
101
472 IR Jammers
103
473 IR Decoys
104
474 IR Chaff
105
EW Against Communications Signals
107
52 HF Propagation
108
521 The Ionosphere
109
522 Ionospheric Reflection
110
523 HF Propagation Paths
111
524 SingleSite Locators
112
53 VHFUHF Propagation
113
566 SignaltoNoise Ratio
128
568 Bandwidth Required for Digital Signals
129
569 Impact of Signal Bandwidth on Electronic Warfare
132
57 Spread Spectrum Signals
133
571 FrequencyHopping Signals
134
572 Chirp Signals
135
573 Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Signals
136
58 Communications Jamming
137
581 JammingtoSignal Ratio
138
582 Operation Near the Earth
139
583 Other Losses
140
59 Jamming Spread Spectrum Signals
141
592 Jamming Chirp Signals
147
594 Impact of ErrorCorrection Coding
149
510 Location of Spread Spectrum Transmitters
150
5102 Location of Chirped Transmitters
153
Accuracy of Emitter Location Systems
155
61 Basic Emitter Location Approaches
156
62 Angle Measurement Techniques
157
622 Multiple Antenna Amplitude Comparison
158
623 WatsonWatt Technique
159
625 Distance Measuring Techniques
160
626 Interferometric Direction Finding
162
63 Precision Emitter Location Techniques
164
632 Precision Emitter Location by FDOA
167
633 FDOA Against Moving Transmitters
169
634 Combined FDOA and TDOA
170
64 Emitter LocationReporting Location Accuracy
171
642 Circular Error Probable
173
643 Elliptical Error Probable
174
651 Combination of Error Elements
175
652 Impact of Reflections on AOA Error
176
654 Error Budget Items for AngleofArrival Emitter Location Approaches
177
655 Error Related to SignaltoNoise Ratio
178
656 Calibration Errors
179
662 Circular Error Probable
182
67 Location Errors in Precision Location Systems
183
672 Location Errors in FDOA Emitter Location Systems
187
Communication Satellite Links
191
72 Terms and Definitions
192
73 Noise Temperature
195
732 Antenna Noise Temperature
196
733 Line Temperature
197
735 A Noise Temperature Example
199
74 Link Losses
200
742 Atmospheric Loss
201
743 Rain and Fog Attenuation
202
744 Faraday Rotation
204
75 Link Losses in Typical Links
205
752 LowEarthSatellite Link
208
76 Link Performance Calculations
209
761 Synchronous Satellite Links
210
762 LowEarthOrbit Links
212
77 Relating Communication Satellite and EW Forms of Equations
214
78 Jamming of Satellite Links
215
781 Downlink Jamming
216
782 Uplink Jamming
217
Problems with Solutions
219
Problems from the EW 102 Book
239
CrossReferences to EW101 Columns in the Journal of Electronic Defense
255
EW 102
256
Selected Bibliography
259
About the Author
263
Index
265
Copyright

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Page 262 - Zissis, (eds.), The Infrared Handbook, Washington, DC: Office of Naval Research, 1985, ISBN 0-9603590-1-x.

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