Excursions in the County of Suffolk: Comprising a Brief Historical and Topographical Delineation of Every Town and Village; Together with Descriptions of the Residences of the Nobility and Gentry, Remains of Antiquity, and Every Other Interesting Object of Curiosity. Forming a Complete Guide for the Traveller and Tourist, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818 - Suffolk (England)
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Page 38 - Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought, That one might almost say her body thought.
Page 191 - A Gothic bishop perhaps thought it proper to repeat such a form in such particular shoes or slippers ; another fancied it would be very decent if such a part of public devotions were performed with a mitre on his head and a crosier in his hand.
Page 108 - THE Lawns were dry in Euston Park ; (Here Truth inspires my Tale;) The lonely footpath, still and dark, Led over Hill and Dale. Benighted was an ancient Dame, And fearful haste she made To gain the vale of Fakenham, And hail its Willow shade. Her footsteps knew no idle stops, But...
Page 12 - The sacrist of the monastery, as often as he let the lauds near the town then and still called Haberdon, annexed this condition, that the tenant should provide a white bull, whenever a matron of rank, or any other should come out of devotion, or in consequence of a vow, to make the oblations of the white bull, as they were denominated, at the shrine of St.
Page 102 - Till sympathetic drops unbidden start, And pangs quick springing muster round his heart ; And soft he treads with other gazers round, And fain would catch her sorrow's plaintive sound. One word alone is all that strikes the ear, One short, pathetic, simple word, — " Oh dear ! " A thousand times repeated to the wind, That wafts the sigh, but leaves the pang behind ! For ever of the proffer'd parley shy, She hears th...
Page 102 - Or soothes her breast, or stops her streaming tears. Her matted locks unornamented flow ; Clasping her knees, and waving to and fro, Her head bow'd down, her faded cheek to hide ; A piteous mourner by the pathway side. Some tufted molehill through the livelong day She calls her throne — there weeps her life away; And oft the...
Page 11 - III., twelve papal bulls, with several deeds, written obligations, and acknowledgments for money due to the convent. Great part of theĢ monastery was reduced to ashes, and many of the manors and granges belonging to it in Bury and its vicinity, shared the same fate. The abbot being at this time in London, the rioters seized and confined Peter Clopton, the prior, and about twenty of the monks, whom they afterwards compelled, in the name of the whole chapter of the convent, to execute, under the capitular...
Page 12 - Guildhall, and Abbey-gate streets, to the great west gate, the lady all the while keeping close to him, and the monks and people forming a numerous cavalcade. Here the procession ended ; the animal was conducted back to his pasture, while the lady repaired to St. Edmund's shrine...
Page 179 - ... pardon, and doubted not that God had forgiven him. He said, that since that time he had an affection for Lady Harriot, and prayed that if it were pleasing to God, it might continue, otherwise that it might cease ; and God heard his prayer. The affection did continue, and therefore he doubted not it was pleasing to God ; and that this was a marriage, their choice of one another being guided not by lust, but...
Page 22 - Bury, on this account, was the resort of persons of the highest distinction, for whom the abbot kept an open table, while those of inferior rank were entertained by the monks in the refectory. The widowed queen of France, sister to Henry VIII., came here every...

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