Excuse Me, Your Participle's Dangling!: How to Use Grammar to Make Your Writing Powers Soar

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2013 - Education - 119 pages
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Excuse Me, Your Participle s Dangling will give you all the bare essentials of grammar that you need to write like a pro. The book also offers a simple yet foolproof method of writing under pressure, the key to success in any college program or workplace. If you re a businessperson, college student, or ESL student seeking a user-friendly grammar book that aims to make you a better writer, this book is for you! If you learn the information in one chapter each day, in less than two weeks, your writing will improve dramatically, and you ll grow in confidence as a writer. You ll also learn shortcuts to help you with all the types of writing you ll do in college and on the job. Try all of them. They really work, and that s a promise. To sum it up, grammar is only a means to an end, a tool to help you write better. That s something your teacher probably never told you. By understanding grammar, you ll learn how to express yourself beautifully in speaking and in writing."
 

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Contents

1 Verbs
1
2 How to Build a Sentence from Start to Finish
11
3 Sentence Fragments and RunOn Sentences
27
4 Adjectives and Adverbs
31
5 Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers
35
6 Commas Part I
43
7 Commas Part II
55
8 The Rest of the Punctuation Marks
59
9 Agreement Problems
71
10 Words Often Confused
81
11 Writing Style
95
12 How to Write Under Pressure Using a Foolproof Plan
103
Answer Key
111
About the Author
121
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About the author (2013)

Catherine DePino has written many books for children, teachers, and parents about writing improvement and bully prevention. She also wrote two upbeat non-denominational prayer books for teenagers. She holds a doctorate from Temple University and served for many years as an English teacher and department head of English, world languages and ESL in the Philadelphia schools. Additionally, she worked for Temple as a student teaching supervisor.

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