Exercise-induced Asthma: Pathophysiology and Treatment

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Human Kinetics, 2002 - Medical - 266 pages
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People with exercise-induced asthma do not have to eliminate or limit physical activity, exercise, or competitive sports from their lives.

Exercise-Induced Asthma: Pathophysiology and Treatment is a comprehensive reference that presents the latest research and scientifically based information you need to ensure every person can be physically active and perform optimally at every level of competition.

Featuring contributions from leading experts in the field, this is the first book to address exercise-induced asthma in those who are physically active and athletic as opposed to the general population. This authoritative guide will enable you to do the following:

-Work more confidently with physically active and athletic people with exercise-induced asthma.

-Understand the physiology of exercise-induced asthma.

-Diagnose accurately and prescribe medication, safe activity, and athletic practices.

-Inform athletes about new medical treatments for exercise-induced asthma.
Exercise-Induced Asthma: Pathophysiology and Treatment walks medical professionals through practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of athletes and other physically active people who have exercise-induced asthma.

It presents the latest breakthroughs in optimizing performance while coping with exercise-induced asthma. It updates readers on which medications are currently accepted and banned in athletic events.

 

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Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Kenneth Rundell, PhD, has been a senior sport physiologist with the United States Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid, New York, since 1992. He is currently full professor and director of the Human Performance Laboratory at Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania, where he continues to test elite athletes and do research on exercise-induced asthma.

Dr. Rundell has researched and written extensively about exercise physiology and exercise-induced asthma; his work includes chapters in books and more than 100 articles in professional journals. He is a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research and Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, and he is a reviewer for several professional journals. He is frequently invited to speak at seminars, conventions, and symposia worldwide. He has been the recipient of more than 15 honors and awards over his long career.

Dr. Rundell earned his PhD in exercise physiology from Syracuse University and has done postdoctoral work in the department of physiology at SUNY Health Science Center College of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Randall Wilber, PhD, has been a senior sport physiologist at the United States Olympic Training Center (USOTC) in Colorado Springs since 1993. At the USOTC, he oversees the operation of the Athlete Performance Laboratory and works closely with America's best athletes and coaches.

Dr. Wilber's research interests include the effects of altitude training on athletic performance and exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in elite athletes. He has written scientific papers on these topics, which have been published in sports medicine journals; and he has been an invited speaker at scientific meetings worldwide. He is currently writing another book, Altitude Training and Athletic Performance, to be published by Human Kinetics.

Dr. Wilber holds a master's degree and PhD in exercise physiology from Florida State University, where he conducted research on training and detraining in endurance athletes. He is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Robert F. Lemanske Jr., MD, is a professor of pediatrics and medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison. Dr. Lemanske received his MD and pediatrics training at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He obtained his subspecialty training in allergy and immunology at both the University of Wisconsin and the National Institutes of Health at Bethesda, Maryland. He has published extensively on basic and clinical aspects of the pathophysiology of asthma.

As a member of the NHLBI Science Base Committee, he helped develop and update the National Asthma Education Program. In 2000, he was the chair of the American Board of Allergy and Immunology. In 2001, he was elected to the board of directors of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

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