Experiences in Software Evolution and Reuse: Twelve Real World Projects

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 18, 1997 - Computers - 147 pages
lfimplementing systematic reuse is risky, not doing it is even more risky. Trying systematic reuse unsuccessfully can cost precious time and resources and may make management sceptical of trying it again. But if your competitors do it successfully and you do not, you may lose market share and possibly an entire market. W. B. Frakes and S. Isoda, 1994 Software companies today are faced with new and more challenging market pressures. In response to this challenge, they have to reduce the time-to-market with new or enhanced products, increase the diversity of products available to the customers, and enhance the standardisation and interoperability of the products. At the same time, many companies carry the burden of large legacy systems, that have become too expensive to maintain and cannot sustain the demands of the marketing department for alterations, leading to business opportunities being lost [BEN95]. However the systems are very valuable and cannot be simply replaced because of the costs that such an operation entails. Simply replacing them may be too expensive because of the huge volumes of on-line data that must be converted, among other reasons.
 

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Contents

The SER Approach
3
12 The Applied Technologies
4
13 Comparison and Synergies
7
14 The Typology of the SER Experiments
11
Benefits of Software Evolution and Reuse
16
22 What Has Been Delivered
18
23 Summing Up
31
Lessons Learned
34
96 Summary of Experiment Results
102
Instrumentation Laboratory
104
103 Opportunities
105
105 Target Organisation
106
BPM
108
112 Motivation for Reuse
109
113 Opportunities
110
115 Target Organisation
111

31 Scenario 1 Product Family
35
32 Scenario 2 Component Based Application Development
38
33 Scenario 3 Application Framework
40
Conclusions and Recommendations
44
41 Reuse Rates
45
42 Reengineering Existing Software vs Building from Scratch
46
44 Costs and Savings
47
Application Experiment Reports
49
XiosBank
51
53 The Business Case for Reuse in Xiosbank
52
54 Findings
54
55 Conclusions
57
Stentofon╣
59
62 Support Needed by Stentofon
62
63 The PROTEUS Approach
64
64 The PROTEUS Approach Applied in Stentofon
72
65 Evaluation
74
66 Conclusions
76
Garex╣
77
72 Industrial Context
78
73 Problem Areas
80
74 The PROTEUS Approach
82
75 Using the PROTEUS Approach at Garex
84
76 Evaluation
88
Bull
92
83 Results
93
9 SIA
97
92 Motivation for Reuse
98
93 Reuse Experiences and Opportunities
99
94 Target Reuse Organisation
101
118 Experiment Objectives
112
119 Summary of Experiment Results
114
Pirelli
115
123 Opportunities
116
125 Target Organisation
117
127 Overall Plan
118
128 Experiment Objectives
119
129 Summary of Experiment Results
122
Ericsson Radar
124
132 Motivation for Reuse
125
134 Target Reuse Organization
126
136 Main Results
127
137 Lessons Learned
128
Norsonic
130
142 Motivation for Reuse
131
145 Results
132
146 Lessons Learned
133
Telecom Company
134
153 Reuse Experiences and Opportunities
135
154 Target Reuse Organisation
136
155 Major Changes Needed
137
Telecom Gateway Framework
139
162 Motivation for Reuse
140
163 Framework Development
141
164 Instantiating the Framework
142
165 Main Results
143
Acronyms
145
References
146
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Page 146 - Gamma et. al.: Design Patterns Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley

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