Exploring Geographic Information Systems

Front Cover
Wiley, 2002 - Science - 305 pages
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the organized activity by which people:
  • measure aspects of geographic phenomena and processes
  • represent these measurements, usually in the form of a computer database, to emphasize spatial themes, entities, and relationships
  • operate upon these representations to produce more measurements, and to discover new relationships by integrating disparate sources; and
  • transform these representations to conform to other frameworks of entities and relationships.

These activities reflect the larger context, such as institutions and cultures, in which these people carry out their work. In turn, the GIS may influence these structures.

This text provides the comprehensive coverage you will need to master this powerful new technology.

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Contents

BASIC BUILDING BLOCKS
1
Convergence of Many Technologies
11
Levels of Measurement
25
Summary
34
Control and Measurement
41
Attribute as Control
44
Spatial Control
53
Composite Frameworks
61
Distance Relationships
153
Extended Voronoi Networks
164
The Spatial Component
179
Combining Neighborhood Attributes
182
Data Quality Applications of Neighborhood Operations
193
A Family of Problems with a Common Approach
211
Transformations
217
A Scheme for Transformations
227

Temporal Frameworks
67
Representation Models and Data Structures
75
Database Architecture
83
Closing the Loop
97
TRANSFORMATIONS AND OPERATIONS
103
Combining Pairs of Input Values
111
Summary
118
Summary
242
THE BROADER ARENA
243
Serving Larger Goals
263
Geographic Information in the Bureaucracy
271
Summary
283
Sources and Credits
293
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Nick Chrisman, University of Washington

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