Exploring the Moon: The Apollo Expeditions

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 16, 2008 - Science - 404 pages
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David Harland opens with a review of the robotic probes, namely the Rangers which returned television before crashing into the Moon, the Surveyors which 'soft landed' in order to investigate the nature of the surface, and the Lunar Orbiters which mapped prospective Apollo landing sites. He then outlines the historic landing by Apollo 11 in terms of what was discovered, and how over the next several missions the program was progressively geared up to enable the final three missions each to spend three days on comprehensive geological investigations. He concludes with a review of the robotic spacecraft that made remote-sensing observations of the Moon. Although aimed at the enthusiast, and can be read as an adventure in exploration, the book develops the scientific theme of lunar geology, and therefore will be of use as background reading for undergraduate students of planetary sciences. In addition, with the prospect of a resumption of human missions, it will help journalists understand what Apollo achieved after the 'flags and footprints' of the Apollo 11 landing in July1969 and will commemorate the fortieth anniversary of that momentous event.

Highlighted as a "Commemorative Edition" on the cover, this second edition will have a new Foreword by one of the original astronauts and a short extra section at the end previewing the prospect of a renewal of human exploration of the Moon. It will include new extra high quality graphics which are only now available and 32 pages of colour illustrations.

 

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Contents

The robots
1
RANGER
3
LUNAR ORBITER
6
SURVEYOR
12
MISSIONS ACCOMPLISHED
18
SELECTING A LANDING SITE
20
Magnificent desolation
23
MOONWALK
24
BEAUTIFUL ROCKS
198
DEPLOYING THE ALSEP
199
FLAG AND SPOOK
202
SAMPLING PLUM
207
BUSTER
213
HEADING SOUTH
219
HIGH ON STONE MOUNTAIN
224
THE LOWER SLOPE
229

MOONROCKS
33
A SENSE OF PERSPECTIVE
38
Pinpoint landing
40
LANDING BY THE SNOWMAN
43
SCIENTIFIC STATION
44
GEOLOGICAL TRAVERSE
49
HURRY UP AND WAIT
59
SECOND ROCK FEST
64
Knowledge from the Moon
67
CUTS
69
APOLLO GROUNDED
71
ONCE MORE MOONBOUND
72
CHORES
73
THE FRA MAURO ROCKS
93
THE BIG PICTURE
95
The wonder of the unknown at HadleyApennine
97
SKIMMING THE MOUNTAINS
100
SITE SURVEY
102
A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP
105
VENTURING OUT
106
WHEELS
107
ACROSS THE PLAIN
112
ON THE RILLE
114
SAMPLING ELBOW
116
ST GEORGE
121
HEADING HOME
130
THE LONG DRIVE SOUTH
132
WORKING ON THE SLOPE
136
SPURS TREASURE
147
TANTALISING DUNE
152
JOURNEYS END
156
THE SAGA OF THE DRILL
157
STARTING THE FINAL DAY
163
RACING WEST
168
ON THE RIM
169
FINAL ACT
180
NO LONGER UNKNOWN
183
Surprise at DescartesCayley
193
BETTER LATE THAN NEVER
196
A PLAN IN TATTERS
197
SAMPLING SOUTH RAY
234
DRIVING NORTH
245
ON NORTH RAYS RIM
248
SHADOW ROCK
254
BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD
257
The beautiful valley of TaurusLittrow
269
A MULTIPLICITY OF OBJECTIVES
272
ROUTINE LANDING
273
FIRST IMPRESSIONS
274
DASH SOUTH
280
SOMEWHERE NEAR STENOS CRATER
285
BACK HOME
290
OUT AGAIN
292
DRIVING WEST
293
THE LIGHT MANTLE
294
BACK DOWN THE SCARP
301
TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS
304
HOLY GRAIL?
305
CAMELOTS BOULDERS
311
THE GEOLOGY OF TRACYS ROCK
318
ANOTHER PIECE OF THE PUZZLE
326
THE SCULPTURED HILLS
327
MYSTERIOUS VAN SERG
330
MANS DESTINY
336
Luna revival
346
ORBITERS
348
LUNOKHODS
349
MISSED OPPORTUNITIES
351
Apollo in context
353
REMOTE SENSING
357
FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE
361
STARTING OVER
362
Spaceflight log
363
Lunar landing sites
365
Apollo missions facts and figures
366
Apollo lunar samples
369
Glossary
373
Chronological bibliography
381
Index
397
Copyright

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Page xx - I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.
Page xx - ... let it be clear that I am asking the Congress and the country to accept a firm commitment to a new course of action — -a course which will last for many years and carry very heavy costs, $531 million in the fiscal year 1962 and an estimated $7-$9 billion additional over the next 5 years.
Page 385 - Noble Gas Abundances in Lunar Material. Cosmic Ray Spallation Products and Radiation Ages From the Sea of Tranquility and the Ocean of Storms. J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 76, 1971, p.
Page xx - In a very real sense, it will not be one man going to the moon ... it will be an entire nation. For all of us must work to put him there.
Page 3 - At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology in the 1970s, researchers compared the characteristics of engines run on hydrogen, gasoline, and mixtures of the two fuels [44].
Page xiv - MSC Manned Spacecraft Center MSFN Manned Space Flight Network NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

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