Extraordinary Canadians: Maurice Richard

Front Cover
Penguin Canada, Mar 8, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
Born in 1921 into a working-class family, Maurice Richard came of age as a French Canadian and athlete during an era when the majority population of Quebec slumbered. A proud, reticent man, Richard aspired only to score goals and win championships for the Montreal Canadiens. But he represented far more than a high-scoring forward who filled seats in NHL arenas. Beginning with his 50-goal, 50-game season in 1944-45 and through his battles with the league over bigotry toward French-Canadian players, Richard's on-ice ferocity and off-ice dignity echoed the change in Quebec. The March 1955 “Richard Riot,” in which fans went on a rampage to protest his suspension, contained the seeds of transformation. By the time Richard retired in 1960, Quebec had begun to reinvent itself as a modern, secular society. Author Charles Foran argues that the province's passionate identification with Richard's success and struggles emboldened its people and changed Canada irrevocably.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - grant5038 - LibraryThing

I am not a Montreal Candiens fan, nor particularly a Maurice Richard fan. But I am a fan of the history of the NHL. This book places Maurice Richard in the context of the times of Quebec prior to the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction by John Ralston Saul
Nobody
A Small People
La Guerre Yes Sir
La Noirceur
A Riot Going
Dynasty
Saint Maurice of French Canada
Un Québécois
BARBOTS
SOURCES AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
CHRONOLOGY
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Charles Foran is a writer of novels, non-fiction, and journalism. He has published eight books, including the multi-award-winning The Last House of Ulster. Though raised in Toronto, he was reared, thanks to a French-Canadian mother, on the Montreal Canadiens. Maurice Richard, who retired from hockey the same year Foran was born, was mistaken by the boy for a local saint, so reverential were the evocations of his name among extended family members. Foran lives with his family in Peterborough, Ontario.

Bibliographic information