Eye of the Albatross: Visions of Hope and Survival

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Macmillan, 2003 - Nature - 377 pages

"One of the most delightful natural history studies in decades." —The Boston Globe

Eye of the Albatross takes us soaring to locales where whales, sea turtles, penguins, and shearwaters flourish in their own quotidian rhythms. Carl Safina's guide and inspiration is an albatross he calls Amelia, whose life and far-flung flights he describes in fascinating detail. Interwoven with recollections of whalers and famous explorers, Eye of the Albatross probes the unmistakable environmental impact of the encounters between man and marine life. Safina's perceptive and authoritative portrait results in a transforming ride to the ends of the Earth for the reader, as well as an eye-opening look at the health of our oceans.

 

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User Review  - uufnn - LibraryThing

The author is a MacArtuhur Fellow, Pew Fellow, 2000 winner of a Lannan award for literature and the president of the Blue Ocean Institute. Edward O. Wilson, author of The Future of Life said, "In this ... Read full review

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User Review  - satyridae - LibraryThing

I'm in love with Safina. I want him to write more books, right away. I want to sell all my worldly goods and devote my life to saving birds. Safina's a delicious prose stylist with a clear, burning passion for animals. Highly recommended. Read full review

Contents

GREETINGS
10
BONDING
38
LETTING GO
58
IN A TURQUOISE MONASTERY
88
MOVING ON
110
A SMALL WORLD
127
WORKING IN OVERDRIVE
163
DREAMING AND DREADING ON ALBATROSS BANK
205
MIDWAY
244
GOING TO EXTREMES
282
TRACKS IN THE SEA
301
HOME AMONG NOMADS
326
LEARNING AND LUCK
342
SELECTED REFERENCES
353
INDEX
357
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About the author (2003)

Carl Safina, author of The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World, Voyage of the Turtle: In Pursuit of the Earth's Last Dinosaur, Eye of the Albatross: Visions of Hope and Survival, Song for the Blue Ocean: Encounters Along the World's Coasts and Beneath the Seas, and founder of the Blue Ocean Institute, was named by the Audubon Society one of the leading conservationists of the twentieth century. He's been profiled by The New York Times, and PBS's Bill Moyers. His books and articles have won him a Pew Fellowship, Guggenheim Award, Lannan Literary Award, John Burroughs Medal, and a MacArthur Prize. He lives in Amagansett, New York.

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