FOX TEXTS

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1907
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Page 153 - Pray, what are these girls going to do?' was the feeling in the hearts of the youths. And to their amazement the girls began to lie with each other. Thereupon...
Page 151 - ... another. After awhile the youths began to suspect something wrong with them. It is reported that this took place in the summer. So it is said that once during the summer, the two maidens started away to peel off bark. The youths followed after, staying just far enough behind to keep within sight of them. The girls went a long way off, and over there is where they stripped off bark. While (the girls) were peeling the bark (the youths) all that time kept themselves hidden from them.
Page 153 - It is said that afterwards one of the maidens became big with child. In the course of time, strange to relate, she gave birth, and the child was like a soft-shell...
Page 161 - Once on a time far in the past there was a man and his wife and their two children — a boy and a girl — who lived far from other people.
Page 5 - ... bow. I a lateral liquid sometimes heard in careless speech. It often replaces the nasal n after u, a, and the dull A. The point of the tongue articulates softly with the upper alveolar, the friction being so slight that the sound has much the nature of a vowel. It is like I in...
Page 4 - ... Publications of the American Ethnological Society. Edited by Franz Boas. Vol. I. Leiden : Late EJ Brill, 1907. 8, vi, 383 pp. The Texts, in Fox and English, consist of five historical tales, twelve miscellaneous myths and traditions, twelve parables, seventeen stories of the culture hero, and four prayers. "The plan of the translation was to follow the order of ideas expressed in the original as far as the idiom would permit, consequently the text can to a great extent be followed word for...
Page 5 - ... the nasal n after u, a, and the dull A. The point of the tongue articulates softly with the upper alveolar, the friction being so slight that the sound has much the nature of a vowel. It is like I in warble: wa'bigutu^
Page 1 - It forms part of a mass of information obtained during the summers of 1901 and 1902 in connection with ethnological work done for the American Museum of Natural History, New York, and for the Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington...
Page 34 - Foxe&, and shows how feeble was the political bond between them and the Sauks. The incident is in sharp contrast to what happened among the Sauks when Keokuk was made chief by a Government officer under much the same circumstances. In the case of the Sauks there was acquiescence, while in that of the Foxes it was just the contrary.
Page 4 - It is not an easy thing to convey the sense of Algonkin by means of an absolutely literal rendering. Yet the translation here offered is in a way fairly close; in some instances it may be too free, while in as many others it may be so close as to obscure the full sense of the original.

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