Fables

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R. Sammer, 1799 - English poetry - 237 pages
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Page 16 - Dr. Swift had been observing once to Mr. Gay, what an odd pretty sort of a thing a Newgate Pastoral might make. Gay was inclined to try at such a thing for some time ; but afterwards thought it would be better to write a comedy on the same plan. This was what gave rise to the Beggar's Opera.
Page 16 - He began on it ; and when first he mentioned it to Swift, the doctor did not much like the project. As he carried it on, he showed what he wrote to both of us, and we now and then gave a correction, or a word or two of advice ; but it was wholly of his own writing. — When it was done, neither of us thought it would succeed. We showed it to Congreve ; who, after reading it over, said, it would either take greatly, or be damned confoundedly.
Page 139 - Friendship, like love, is but a name, Unless to one you stint the flame. The child, whom many fathers share, Hath seldom known a father's care. Tis thus in friendships; who depend On many, rarely find a friend.
Page 139 - And from the deep-mouth'd thunder flies; She starts, she stops, she pants for breath; She hears the near advance of death; She doubles to mislead the...
Page 138 - The scaly people of the main, The beasts that range the wood or plain, The wing'd inhabitants of air, The day, the night, the various year ; And know all these by heav'n design'd As gifts to pleasure human kind, I cannot raise my worth too high ; Of what vast consequence am I ! Not of th' importance you suppose, Replies a Flea upon his nose.
Page 84 - What means yon peasant's daily toil, From choking weeds to rid the soil? Why wake you to the morning's care, Why with new arts correct the year, Why...
Page 125 - To foam and champ the galling bit? Shall haughty man my back bestride ? Shall the sharp spur provoke my side ? Forbid it Heavens!
Page 29 - He fed his flock and penn'd the fold : His hours in cheerful labour flew. Nor envy nor ambition knew : His wisdom and his honest fame Through all the country rais'd his name.
Page 141 - I, says he, of tender age, In this important care engage? Older and abler passed you by; How strong are those, how weak am I! Should I presume to bear you hence, Those friends of mine may take offence. Excuse me, then. You know my heart; But...
Page 140 - She next the stately Bull implored ; And thus replied the mighty lord: "Since every beast alive can tell That I sincerely wish you well ; I may, without offence, pretend To take the freedom of a friend. Love calls me hence ; a...

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