Fables

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Ward, 1879 - 30 pages
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Page 31 - When a word ends with a doubl letter, omit the last, as in shal, clif, eg, etc. 5. — Change ed final to t where it has the sound of t as in lasht, imprest, etc.
Page 3 - THE CROW AND THE PITCHER A Crow, ready to die with thirst, flew with joy to a Pitcher, which he saw at a distance. But when he came up to it, he found the water so low that with all his stooping and straining he was unable to reach it. Thereupon he tried to break the Pitcher; then to overturn it ; but his strength was not sufficient to do either. At last, seeing some small pebbles at hand, he dropped a great many of them, one by one, into the Pitcher, and so raised the water to the brim, and quenched...
Page 35 - By the phonetic alphabet a child may be taught the art of reading, not fluently but well, both in phonetic and in ordinary books, in three months — aye, often in twenty hours of thorough instruction, a task which is rarely accomplished in three years of toil by the old alphabet. What father or teacher will not gladly hail and earnestly work for this great boon to education — this powerful machine for the diffusion of knowledge.
Page 7 - THE FOX AND THE WOODMAN A Fox, hard pressed by the hounds after a long run, came up to a man who was cutting wood, and begged him to afford him some place where he might hide himself. The man showed him his own hut, and the Fox creeping in, hid himself in a corner. The Hunters presently came up, and asking the man whether he had seen the Fox, "No," said he, but pointed with his finger to the corner.
Page 4 - ... we must work at it with our own hands, Mr. Barlow told them the tale of a lark that had a nest of young birds in a field of corn, and one day two men came to look at the state of the crop.
Page 4 - In the course of a day or two, as the man found that no one came, he said to his son, " Hark you, John ; we will trust to none, but you and I will reap the corn at dawn of day.
Page 7 - ... hint, were off again immediately. When the Fox perceived that they were out of sight, he was stealing off without saying a word. But the man upbraided him, saying, " Is this the way you take leave of your host, without a word of thanks for your safety?
Page 7 - No," said he, but pointed with his finger to the corner. They, however, not understanding the hint, were off again immediately. When the Fox perceived that they were out of sight, he was stealing off without saying a word. But the man upbraided him, saying, " Is this the way you take leave of your host, without a word of thanks for your safety.
Page 6 - Mr. Barlow then told Tom that, in days long gone by, a Greek slave wrote a tale to prove that it is not wise to play with edge tools, as Tom had just done ; and this was the tale : " A wolf had a bone that stuck in his throat, and gave him so much pain that he ran with a howl to ask all whom he met to lend him a kind hand, and said he would give a large sum to bird or beast who would take it out. At last a crane put her long bill down the wolfs throat, and drew out the bone. The crane then said,...
Page 31 - RULE 4. — When a word ends with a double letter, omit the last, as in shal, wil, clif, etc. RULE 5.

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