Fables from the Jewish Tradition

Front Cover
Mayapple Press, 2008 - Religion - 103 pages
0 Reviews
Cultural Writing. Judaica. Jewish Fables. Translated by Sandy Berkofsky-Santana. Illustrated by Marcelo Ferder. FABLES FROM THE JEWISH TRADITION is a graceful English presentation of Jewish fables and their cultural and religious context. Luminous color illustrations by Marcelo Ferder, Kogan's extensive notes, and his enlightening short essay about fables and the Jewish textual tradition are highlights of the collection. Presented in an attractive, contemporary format, this book offers a brief but varied group of 40 fables which can be found scattered through the Talmud and in certain collections of midrashim. Because they are stories about talking animals and their interactions with each other and with humans, they seem like simple "fairy tales" about how people live and should behave. For this reason, they offer readers--including children--a way into understanding the Talmud and Midrash, often thought of as impenetrable or arcane. The notes and essay help to explain the Jewish teachings to be found in the fables. The appeal of this book goes far beyond schoolchildren. Readers who love fables will recognize universal themes here, but with the point of view and wisdom of Jewish tradition going back thousands of years. Even the reader who is relatively unfamiliar with Jewish culture will see a different, often unexpected slant on old concepts and topics.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Author Rabbi Manes Kogan, an Argentinian Jew currently working as a Conservative rabbi in the United States, compiled the fables and wrote the notes and commentary, originally in Spanish. Illustrator Marcelo Ferder and translator Sandy Berkofsky-Santana live in the Dominican Republic.

Because they are stories about talking animals and their interactions with each other and with humans, fables seem like simple ┐fairy tales┐ about how people live and should behave. But these Jewish fables also offer readers┐including children┐a way into understanding the Talmud and Midrash, often thought of as impenetrable or arcane.

Bibliographic information