Faces At The Bottom Of The Well: The Permanence Of Racism

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Basic Books, Oct 13, 1992 - Social Science - 240 pages
The noted civil rights activist uses allegory and historical example to present a radical vision of the persistence of racism in America. These essays shed light on some of the most perplexing and vexing issues of our day: affirmative action, the disparity between civil rights law and reality, the “racist outbursts” of some black leaders, the temptation toward violent retaliation, and much more.

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User Review  - Hccpsk - LibraryThing

Renowned civil rights lawyer and activist, Derek Bell, turned to writing later in his career as a way to forward the discussions around race and critical race theory in the United States. Faces at the ... Read full review

FACES AT THE BOTTOM OF THE WELL: The Permanence of Racism

User Review  - Kirkus

Here, as he did in And We Are Not Saved, Harvard Law School professor Bell offers dramatized accounts of the dilemma of race relations in America. Bell uses stories and fables to examine such themes ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction Divining Our Racial Themes
1
A Limited Legacy
15
The Afrolantica Awakening
32
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

A lawyer, educator, and writer, Derrick Bell was educated at both Duquesne University and Pittsburgh University. He was the first African American professor to be tenured at Harvard Law School. He was the dean of the University of Oregon Law School and a professor at the New York University Law School. Bell has held such positions as executive director of the Western Center on Law and Poverty at the University of California, counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and deputy director of the Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Bell has contributed writing to the following publications: Harvard, Yale, Columbia, and UCLA legal journals, Essence, Mother Jones, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, and The Christian Science Monitor. He has written Race, Racism and American Law and the story, Space Traders, which was adapted as a movie for HBO.

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