Facial attractiveness: evolutionary, cognitive, and social perspectives

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Ablex, 2002 - Family & Relationships - 311 pages
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Using evolutionary, cognitive, and social psychology, this volume examines the issues raised by the question, "What makes some faces more attractive than others?" The authors challenge the views that beauty is simply in the "eye of the beholder," that it is idiosyncratic, and that it is nothing more than an artifact of culture. They argue instead that there are a variety of biological, social, motivational, and developmental issues involved in facial attractiveness. By exploring attractiveness and preference from these various perspectives, this collection offers profound and unique insight on how and why we are attracted to certain facial types, and how that attraction can influence our social interaction. Some of the ideas presented in Facial Attractiveness are surprising, others controversial, and others even paradoxical. Combined, however, they offer a new perspective on age-old questions of attraction, beauty and preference. Each author challenges standard assumptions about beauty, and encourages the reader to explore new trends in evolutionary, social, and cognitive psychology in search of a more coherent answer to the questions of what makes a face attractive and why.

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Contents

CrossCultural Evidence
35
Evolution and Individual Differences in the Perception
59
NDimensional Feature Space
91
Copyright

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Biological Psychology
Frederick M. Toates
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (2002)

GILLIAN RHODES is Professor of Psychology at the University of Western Australia and the author of Superportraits: Caricatures and Recognition.LESLIE A. ZEBROWITZ is Manuel Yellen Professor of Social Relations and Professor of Psychology at Brandeis University.

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