Facing the Wind: A True Story of Tragedy and Reconciliation

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Random House Trade Paperbacks, Apr 1, 2002 - True Crime - 320 pages
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Robert and Mary Rowe’s second child, Christopher, was born with severe neurological and visual impairments. For many years, the Rowes’ courageous response to adversity set an example for other parents of children with birth defects. Then the pressures on Bob Rowe—personal and professional—took their toll, and he fell into depression and, ultimately, delusion. And one day he took a baseball bat and killed his wife and three children. Julie Salamon deftly avoids sensationalism as she tells the Rowes’ tragic story with intelligence, sympathy, and insight. Like all great literary journalism, Facing the Wind asks us to join its issues and examine our own lives and problems in the new, bright light that good writing always sheds.
 

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User Review  - glinfoot - LibraryThing

Excellent read! Explores raising a severely handicapped child, murder by reason of insanity, putting your life back together; all the nuances, implications, and issues, challenging and thought provoking. Read full review

Facing the wind: a true story of tragedy and reconciliation

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This is the haunting story of Robert Rowe, a respected lawyer, loving husband, doting father and multiple murderer. It is also the story of the mothers of disabled children who came together at ... Read full review

Contents

The Beginning
9
The Second Son
18
Skills of Daily Living
27
The Mothers
36
The Happy Family
47
Neither Here nor There
57
One Sees the Other Doesnt
66
Acceptance
73
A New Person
179
Father Mother Sister Brother
185
Real Life
203
The Leper 2I 2
212
The Final Appeal
229
i
247
The Meeting
249
The Other Side of the Door
261

The Ocularist
90
Afraid
109
Reaction I 19
119
The Defendant
127
PART II
147
Case Number og2182
159
Another Mother
274
The Cycle of Life
289
Source Notes and Acknowledgments
293
Bibliography
297
A Readers Guide
303
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About the author (2002)

Robert and Mary Rowe’s second child, Christopher, was born with severe neurological and visual impairments. For many years, the Rowes’ courageous response to adversity set an example for other parents of children with birth defects. Then the pressures on Bob Rowe—personal and professional—took their toll, and he fell into depression and, ultimately, delusion. And one day he took a baseball bat and killed his wife and three children. Julie Salamon deftly avoids sensationalism as she tells the Rowes’ tragic story with intelligence, sympathy, and insight. Like all great literary journalism, Facing the Wind asks us to join its issues and examine our own lives and problems in the new, bright light that good writing always sheds.

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