Factory Women in Taiwan

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1994 - Business & Economics - 231 pages
0 Reviews
This study describes the first generation of working women in Taiwan, documenting their feelings about employment and addressing the effects of wage-earning on the status and lives of women in general. Although working women enjoy greater mobility and increased peer contact, the study proves that the changes they have experienced are brought about by being away from home, rather than by wage-earning itself. Wage-earning has not empowered women to influence family decisions, nor has it brightened their future options. The author demonstrates how factory work for young women becomes a new opportunity to meet already existing role expectations, and that the values on which role definitions are based have not been changed by the work experience.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Measuring Improvement in Female Status
1
Women and the Family in Traditional China
7
Women and Work in Traditional China
17
An Overview
37
Where and Why
51
Residence of Factory Women
69
Adjusting to the Factory Environment
77
Relations in the Workplace
89
Dating and Marriage 727
127
Factory Employment After Marriage
143
A Frog in a Well
153
Worker Consciousness
171
WageEarning Family Structure and Women
181
Studying Social Change 799
199
Bibliography
227
Copyright

Control of Income and Womens Position in the Family
113

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Lydia Kung, a noted anthropologist, is now a successful businesswoman.

Bibliographic information