Facts Better Than Arguments: In a Letter to the Right Honourable William Windham

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J. Ginger, 1804 - Great Britain - 185 pages
 

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Page 56 - Glory is like a circle in the water, Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, Till, by broad spreading, it disperse to nought.
Page 117 - May, the utmost industry was still employed by evildisposed persons within this kingdom, acting in concert with persons in foreign parts, with a view to subvert the laws and established constitution of this realm; and to destroy all order and government therein...
Page 125 - left undone those things which he ought to have done, and done those things which he ought not to have done,' and he said so over and over again to himself, and to his parents too.
Page 99 - France do what she will: for, if we are of opinion, that war, continued at present, must be ruin, in the course of a few years; what do we suppose it must be, when, to replace -us, where we now are, we must begin by the re'covery of that list of places, which the present treaty has given up? France, therefore, will be under no necessity...
Page 13 - ... bottom of my heart and with the solemnity of a death-bed declaration (a situation much resembling that in which we all stand), when I declare that my hon. friends who, in a moment of rashness and weakness, fatally put their hands to this treaty, have signed the death-warrant of their country. They have given it a blow under which it may languish for a few years, but from which I do not conceive how it is possible for it ever to recover.
Page 108 - The shades of Pym, Hampden, and of Sydney, are hovering over your heads; and the moment cannot be distant, when the people of France will offer their congratulations to a national convention in England.
Page 99 - ... to be endured. At all events, with its present feelings and opinions, the country never can go to war again, let France do what she will: for, if we are of opinion, that war, continued at present, must be ruin, in the course of a few years; what do we suppose it must be, when, to replace -us, where we now are, we must begin by the re'covery of that list of places, which the present treaty has given up? France, therefore, will...
Page 77 - no reason why it should not be so. We " have nothing to say against those meek " and unambitious persons, who sicken at " the sound of military fame and national " conquests ; but, we must confess, that, " for our parts, we should not like a leader...
Page 112 - ... make war against us. Will the English republicans suffer it ? Already these free men show their discontent, and the repugnance they have to bear arms against their brothers the French. Well ! we will fly to their succour — we will make a descent on the island — we will lodge there fifty thousand caps of liberty— we will plant there the sacred tree — we will stretch out our arms to our republican brethren, and the tyranny of their government shall soon be destroyed.
Page 100 - ... as often as she shall see occasion, by a smart threat of war. I cannot conceive the object, which a judicious application of these two means is not calculated to obtain. A peace, such as France has now made, mixed with proper proportions of a seasonable menace of war, ' is -a. specific, for undoing a rival country, which seems to me impossible to fail...

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