Fahrenheit 451

Front Cover
Simon & Schuster, 1993 - Fiction - 190 pages
2072 Reviews
Celebrate the 40th anniversary of this timeless classic with a special edition featuring a new foreword by the author and a message that is as relevant today as when it was first published. Since the late 1940s, Ray Bradbury has been revered for his works of science fiction and fantasy. With more than 4 million copies in print, Fahrenheit 451 -- originally published in 1953 -- remains his most acclaimed work: "One of the most brilliant overall jobs of social satire."
The Nation "Frightening in its implications...Mr. Bradbury's account of this insane world, which bears many alarming resemblances to our own, is fascinating."
The New York Times Fahrenheit 451 is the temperature at which book paper burns. Fahrenheit 451 is a short novel set in the (perhaps near) future when "firemen" burn books forbidden by the totalitarian "brave new world" regime. The hero, according to Mr. Bradbury, is "a book burner who suddenly discovers that books are flesh and blood ideas and cry out silently when put to the torch." Today, when libraries and schools are still "burning" certain books, Fahrenheit 451 is a work of even greater impact and timeliness.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
869
4 stars
702
3 stars
331
2 stars
112
1 star
58

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CSDaley - LibraryThing

I will be working through all of Bradbury's books but I started with my favorite. This book may even be scarier today than when I read it as a kid. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KristyJewel - LibraryThing

I wanted to like the book but it really was not for me. I love the message of the novel. I love the fact that Ray Bradbury showed how important knowledge is. I'm just not into the novel. So many ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

Ray Bradbury has published some twenty-seven books -- novels, stories, plays, essays, and poems -- since his first story appeared when he was twenty years old. He began writing for the movies in 1952 -- with the script for his own Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. The next year he wrote the screenplay for It Came from Outer Space. In 1953 he lived in Ireland writing the script of Moby Dick for John Huston. In 1961 he wrote the narration spoken by Orson Welles for King of Kings, and the short animated film Icarus Montgolfier Wright, based on his story of the history of flight, was nominated for an Academy Award. Films have been made of his "Picasso Summer," The Illustrated Man, Fahrenheit 451, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. Since 1985 he has adapted his stories for his own half-hour show on USA Cable television.

Bibliographic information