Bower of Woodstock

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Orlando Hodgson, 1824 - 23 pages
 

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Page 20 - There's such sweet pain in parting, That I could hang for ever on thy arms, And look .away my life into thy eyes.
Page 20 - tis to be no more ; another name for death : Tis the sun parting from the frozen north ;' And I, methinks, stand on some icy cliff, To watch the last low circles that he makes, Till he sink down from heaven...
Page 18 - ... into the most remote apartments, the skilful artist had left a clue of silver thread, without the guidance of which it was an impossibility to be done. About this bower were curious gardens, fountains, and a wilderness, with all manner of delights for pleasant situation and recreation, to furnish it as another earthly paradise for so fair a creature to inhabit ; and there the King often resorted to see his beloved Rosamond. But this more enraged the Queen ; not only that she should have so famous...
Page 15 - King would not sufTei her, and said, " Kneel not, dearest Rosamond : it is I that should kneel to thee— I only ask — " Rosamond interrupting him, said, " Ask for my life, great Sire, and you shall have it, or any thing that is in my power to give; but ask not for my honor, that is so precious and valuable, I can never part with it but to a husband.
Page 18 - ... rooms, and galleries, secured with an hundred and fifty doors. To find the way out of and into the most remote apartments, the skilful artist had left a clue of silver thread...
Page 22 - ... was delivered, and then she would willingly submit to die, so that the child might be saved alive. This last request the more incensed the jealous Queen ; for, hearing she was with child, her fury broke forth beyond all moderation; when snatching up a golden bowl, which stood on the table, she poured a draught of deadly poison into it, which she had brought with her, commanding her to drink it up immediately; at...
Page 21 - ... promotion ; and by persuasions and large offers, prevailed so far with them, that they vowed to stand by her in any dangerous attempt. It being summer time, she undertook an excursion, as she gave out, for her health; appointing at a set time her conspirators to hide themselves in a cave near the bower, she hid herself in a grove, and sent one of her pages, dressed as a post-boy to deliver a...
Page 7 - I confess, read without pleasure, that rny idea, as your Majesty is pleased to flatter me, should have an influence in making you a conqueror over your enemies. May it please your Majesty, I cannot but interest myself so much in your affairs, as to rejoice when you are victorious, and be glad of your success ; but as to my being placed in a glittering sphere, above the reach of those I dread, I neither understand it, nor dare...
Page 6 - Having given store of gold to the servants, he took leave of his mistress, which he had no sooner done, than he heard that troubles were again risen in his territories beyond the seas, which required his presence to allay and settle. The King raising a gallant army, passed into France. The terror of his name so daunted his enemies, that they quickly fled, leaving the towns and castles they had surprised lo his obedience.
Page 12 - King would make her welcome ; which, though he only spoke to feel her pulse, he found her willing to accept his offer ; and therefore, without more to do, provided for her journey a very noble chariot ; and so, attended by her tutoress, and a few trusty servants he brought her to court, and put her into those lodgings which the King had appointed for her reception. Her uncle having acquainted the King that she was come and how he had disposed of her...

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