Fair Weather

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Puffin Books, 2003 - Juvenile Fiction - 160 pages
7 Reviews
Thirteen-year-old Rosie Beckett has never strayed further from her family's farm than a horse can pull a cart. Then a letter from her Aunt Euterpe arrives, and everything changes. It's 1893, the year of the World's Columbian Exposition-the "wonder of the age"-a.k.a. the Chicago World's Fair. Aunt Euterpe is inviting the Becketts to come for a visit and go to the fair! Award-winning author Richard Peck's fresh, realistic, and fun-filled writing truly brings the World's Fair-and Rosie and her family-to life.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tloeffler - LibraryThing

Young Rosie Beckett, her sister Lottie, her brother Buster, and their Granddad visit the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. A great little YA book, fun, interesting, Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - genevieve1331 - LibraryThing

“Fair Weather,” by Richard Peck is a story about the Beckett family and their trip to Chicago to see the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, also known as the World’s Fair, which was held to ... Read full review

Contents

The Curve of the Earth
18
Christmas in July
25
Flying to the Moon
53
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Richard Peck has written more than thirty novels, and in the process has become one of the country's most highly respected writers for children. In fact The Washington Post called him "America's best living author for young adults." A versatile writer, he is beloved by middle-graders as well as young adults for his historical and contemporary comedies and coming-of-age novels. He lives in New York City, and spends a great deal of time traveling around the country to speaking engagements at conferences, schools, and libraries.

Mr. Peck is the first children's book author to have received a National Humanities Medal. He is a Newbery Medal winner (for A Year Down Yonder), a Newbery Honor winner (for A Long Way from Chicago), a two-time National Book Award finalist, and a two-time Edgar Award winner. In addition, he has won a number of major honors for the body of his work, including the Margaret A. Edwards Award, the ALAN Award, and the Medallion from the University of Southern Mississippi.

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