Fairfax: Or, The Master of Greenway Court, a Chronicle of the Valley of the Shenandoah

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Carleton & Company; London, S. Low, son & Company, 1868 - Shenandoah River Valley (Va. and W. Va.) - 405 pages
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Page 407 - With illustration. I2mo. cloth, $1.75 THE PROFESSOR. — do. . do. . do. $1-75 SHIRLEY. — .do. . do.. . do. $i.7S VILLETTE. — . do. . do. . do. $iť75 Hand-Books of Society* THE HABITS OF GOOD SOCIETY; with thoughts, hints, and anecdotes, concerning nice points of taste, good manners, and the art of making oneself agreeable.
Page 165 - The witch had but one way of relieving herself from any spell inflicted on her in any way, which was that of borrowing something, no matter what, of the family to which the subject of the exercise of her witchcraft belonged. I have known several poor old women much surprised at being refused requests which had usually been granted without hesitation, and almost heart broken when informed of the cause of the refusal.
Page 165 - ... nor cured, were usually ascribed to some supernatural agency of a malignant kind. For the cure of the diseases inflicted by witchcraft, the picture of the supposed witch was drawn on a stump or piece of board and shot at with a bullet containing a little bit of silver. This silver bullet transferred a painful and sometimes a mortal spell on that part of the witch corresponding with the part of the portrait struck by the bullet.
Page 165 - Diseases which neither could be accounted for nor cured, were usually ascribed to some supernatural agency of a malignant kind. For the cure of the diseases inflicted by witchcraft, the picture of the supposed witch was drawn on a stump or a board, and shot at with a bullet containing a little bit of silver.
Page 65 - Hum! hum!" said the stranger with his former smile, "I was not wrong in declaring you a republican — but that's no matter. What care we for kings or nobles in the wilds here? Here's the river." And with these laconic words the huntsman pushed his horse into the water ; and, half fording, half swimming, soon reached the opposite bank. George was there as quickly, and they again set forward — soon issuing from the forest into the waving prairie, whose myriads of brilliant flowers were glittering...
Page 309 - ... dumb animals. After these atrocities they moved off with forty-eight prisoners; among whom were Mrs. Painter, five of her daughters, and one of her sons; a Mrs. Smith and several of her children; a Mr. Fisher and several of his children, among them a lad of twelve or thirteen years old, a fine well grown boy, and remarkably fleshy.
Page 408 - BOOK ABOUT LAWYERS. — Reprinted from the late English Edition. Intensely interesting . . I2mo. cloth, $2.00 Allan Grant. LOVE IN LETTERS. — A fascinating book of love-letters from celebrated a:id notorious persons.
Page 408 - RUTLEDGE. — A deeply interesting novel. I2mo. cloth, $1.75 THE SUTHERLANDS. do. . . do. $1-75 FRANK WARRINGTON. — do. . . do. $1-75 ST. PHILIP'S.— . . do. . . do.
Page 165 - This inflicted a spell upon the witch which could only be removed by borrowing as above stated. Witches were often said to milk the cows of their neighbors. This they did by fixing a new pin in a new towel for each cow intended to be milked. This towel was hung over her own door, and by means of certain incantations, the milk was extracted from the fringes of the towel after the manner of milking a cow. This happened when the cows were too poor to give much milk.
Page 165 - The belief in witchcraft was prevalent among the early settlers of the western country. To the witch was ascribed the tremendous power of inflicting strange and incurable diseases, particularly on children, of destroying cattle by shooting them with hair balls, and a great variety of other means of destruction, of inflicting spells and curses on guns and other things, and lastly of changing men into horses, and after bridling and saddling them, riding them in full speed over hill and dale to their...

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