Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland: The elves in Ireland. The elves in Scotland. On the nature of the elves. The Mabinogion and fairy legends of Wales

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J. Murray, 1828 - Mabinogion
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Page 108 - Thropes and bernes, shepenes and dairies, This maketh that ther ben no faeries : For ther as wont to walken was an elf, Ther walketh now the limitour himself, In undermeles and in morweninges, And sayth his Matines and his holy thinges, As he goth in his limitatioun. Women may now go safely up and doun, In every bush and under every tree, Ther is non other incubus but he, And he ne will don hem no dishonour.
Page 107 - Danced ful oft in many a grene mede. This was the old opinion as I rede; I speke of many hundred yeres ago; But now can no man see non elves mo, For now the grete charitee and prayeres Of limitoures and other holy freres, That serchen every land and every streme, As thikke as motes in the sonne-beme, Blissiug halles, chambres, kichenes, and boures, Citees and burghes, castles highe and toures, Thropes and bernes, shepenes and dairies, This maketh that ther ben no faeries : For ther as wont to walken...
Page 268 - Here he designed also to knock : but he had the curiosity to step on a little bank which commanded a low parlour ; and, looking in, he beheld a vast table, in the middle of the room, of black marble, and on it, extended at full length, a man or rather monster...
Page 243 - ... golden ball with which he used to divert himself, and brought it...
Page 262 - ... his pocket ; but the theft boded him no good. As soon as he had touched unhallowed ground the flower vanished and he lost his senses. Of this injury the Fair Family took no notice at the time. They dismissed their guests with their accustomed courtesy, and the door was closed as usual. But their resentment ran high.
Page 63 - Bretons speken gret honour, All was this lond fulfilled of faerie ; The Elf-quene, with hire joly compagnie. Danced ful oft in many a grene mede. This was the old opinion as I rede...
Page 242 - When a youth, about twelve years of age, in order to avoid the severity of his preceptor, he ran away and concealed himself under the hollow bank of a river ; and after fasting in that situation for two days, two little men of pigmy stature appeared to him, and said, " If you will go with us, we will lead you into a country full of delights and sports.
Page iii - Fairy creed must have been a complete and connected system. I have taken some pains to seek after stories of the Elves in England; but I find that the belief has nearly disappeared, and in another century no traces of English Fairies will remain, except those which exist in the works of Shakspeare, Herrick, Drayton, and Bishop Corbet.
Page 294 - Kyhirraeth is often heard, gave me the following remarkable account of it. " That it is a doleful, disagreeable sound, heard before the deaths of many, and most apt to be heard before foul weather. The voice resembles the groaning of sick persons who are to die, heard at first at a distance, then comes nearer, and the last near at hand ; so that it is a threefold warning of death, the king of terrors. It begins strong, and louder than a sick man can make ; the second cry is lower, but not less doleful,...
Page 108 - ... as he goth in his limitatioun. Women may now go safely up and doun in every bush, and under every tree ; ther is non other incubus but he, and he ne will don hem no dishonour.

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