Falling Slowly

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 8, 2012 - Fiction - 240 pages
1 Review
The brilliant Anita Brookner, praised by The New York Times as "one of the finest novelists of her generation," now gives us a stunning story of two sisters and the strange patterns of identity and love.
        The Sharpe sisters have lived a careful and contemplative existence. Miriam is a translator of French texts and Beatrice a moderately successful pianist. Their lives of quiet sophistication are suddenly interrupted by several complicated men: Max, Beatrice's agent; Simon, a handsome and charming married man; and Tom Rivers, a journalist who befriends Miriam. These men create disorder in the Sharpe sisters' controlled lives as Miriam, the unromantic stoic of the two, begins an affair and Beatrice's career undergoes an unexpected change.
        The exquisite writing, affecting characters, and astonishing psychological perceptions for which Anita Brookner is famous are evident on every page of this beautiful novel by a modern master.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

FALLING SLOWLY

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Brookner's 18th novel (Visitors, 1998. etc.) offers moving variations on the animating theme of all her fiction: the origins, nature, and consequences of human isolation. This time, the theme is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pdebolt - LibraryThing

This very typical Brookner novel describes the lives of "quiet desperation" led by the Sharpe sisters. Miriam and Beatrice are achingly lonely and resigned to their quiet pursuits. Miriam, who was ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
Chapter
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter
Chapter Seven
Chapter Eight
Chapter Nine
Chapter
Chapter Eleven
Chapter Twelve
Chapter Thirteen
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Anita Brookner was born in London and, apart from several years in Paris, has lived there ever since. She trained as an art historian and taught at the Courtauld Institute of Art until 1988.

Bibliographic information