False Promises: The Shaping of American Working Class Consciousness

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Duke University Press, 1992 - Social Science - 470 pages
This classic study of the American working class, originally published in 1973, is now back in print with a new introduction and epilogue by the author. An innovative blend of first-person experience and original scholarship, Aronowitz traces the historical development of the American working class from post-Civil War times and shows why radical movements have failed to overcome the forces that tend to divde groups of workers from one another. The rise of labor unions is analyzed, as well as their decline as a force for social change. Aronowitz’s new introduction situates the book in the context of developments in current scholarship and the epilogue discusses the effects of recent economic and political changes in the American labor movement.
 

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Contents

Lordstown Disruption on the Assembly Line
21
Colonized Leisure Trivialized Work
51
Formation of the Industrial Working Class
137
Trade Unionism Illusion and Reality
214
The Formation of the Professional Servant Class
264
The WhiteCollar Proletarians
291
The Unsilent Fifties
323
Epilogue
395
Short Bibliography
445
Index
449
Copyright

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Page xliv - JGA Pocock, The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975), and "Virtue and Commerce in the Eighteenth Century," Journal of Interdisciplinary History 3 (1972): 119-34.
Page xxx - But tell me whether or not, occupying the position we do, private conscience should not yield to that imperial one formulated in the code under which alone we officially proceed?

About the author (1992)

Stanley Aronowitz is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is founder of the Center for Worker Education at the City College of New York. He lives in New York City.

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