Family Matters

Front Cover
McClelland & Stewart, 2003 - Canadian literature - 469 pages
19 Reviews
Set in Bombay in the mid-1990s, "Family Matters "tells a story of familial love and obligation, of personal and political corruption, of the demands of tradition and the possibilities for compassion. Nariman Vakeel, the patriarch of a small discordant family, is beset by Parkinson's and haunted by memories of his past. He lives with his two middle-aged stepchildren, Coomy, bitter and domineering, and her brother, Jal, mild-mannered and acquiescent. But the burden of the illness worsens the already strained family relationships. Soon, their sweet-tempered half-sister, Roxana, is forced to assume sole responsibility for her bedridden father. And Roxana's husband, besieged by financial worries, devises a scheme of deception involving his eccentric employer at a sporting goods store, setting in motion a series of events that leads to the narrative's moving outcome. "Family Matters" has all the richness, the gentle humour, and the narrative sweep that have earned Mistry the highest of accolades around the world.

"From the Hardcover edition."

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmoncton - LibraryThing

Nariman Vakeel suffers from Parkinson's Disease and is living the end of his life with his stepchildren, Jal and Coomy. Although Jal and Coomy have a spacious apartment with enough room for Nariman ... Read full review

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User Review  - Beamis12 - LibraryThing

The one thing that is common to all cultures is the difficulties in taking care of our aged parents or other family members. So from the beginning this story really hit home, basically had something ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Rohinton Mistry is the author of three novels, all of which have been shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and a collection of short stories, "Tales from Firozsha Baag."
His first novel, "Such a Long Journey," won the Governor General's Award, the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book, and the SmithBooks/"Books in Canada" First Novel Award. It was made into an acclaimed feature film in 1998.
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"A Fine Balance" was winner of the Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book, the Los Angeles Times Fiction Prize, the Royal Society of Literature's Winifred Holtby Award, and Denmark's ALOA Prize. It was shortlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and the Prix Femina. In 2002, "A Fine Balance" was selected for Oprah's Book Club.
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"Family Matters" won the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize for Fiction and the Canadian Authors Association Fiction Award. It was shortlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.
Born in Bombay, Rohinton Mistry has lived in Canada since 1975. He was awarded the Trudeau Fellows Prize in 2004, and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2005. Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2009, he was a finalist for the 2011 Man Booker International Prize, and winner of the 2012 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. In translation, his work has been published in more than thirty languages.

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