Family Kitchen Gardener: Containing Plans & Accurate Descriptions of All Differnt Species & Varieties of Culinary Vegetables

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Riker, 1847 - Fruit-culture - 216 pages
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Page 126 - Tomate, Fr. — Liebes Apfel, Ger. IN taking a retrospect of the past eighteen years, there is no vegetable on the catalogue that has obtained such popularity in so short a period as the one now under consideration. In 1828-9 it was almost detested ; in ten years more every variety of pill and panacea was
Page 22 - ... the other side of the trench ; and, having the plants ready, set a row along the trench, nine inches apart, with the crown of the roots two inches below the surface, drawing some earth, just to fix them as placed. Having planted one row, directly cover them in...
Page 23 - ... spade. Stirring the bed in this manner enables the shoots to rise in free growth ; admits the air, rain, and sunshine into the ground, and encourages the roots to produce buds of a strong size. A full crop may be expected the fourth season after planting. The proper method...
Page 216 - THE FRUIT. — The common practice of picking the fruit with the footstalks attached, is one of the very worst systems, causing them to be handled and re-picked before they go to the table. Early in the morning take a vessel, basket, or box, of convenient size, and pick the fruit before it is softened by the sun. Lay hold of the calyx or cup at the base of the fruit, with the nail of the first finger and thumb of the left hand, and with the first finger of the right, give the fruit a gentle but quick...
Page 76 - Mushroom, from which it ia distinguished by the cap being hollow within, and adhering to the stem by its base, and latticed on the surface with irregular sinuations. The height is about four inches. It is in perfection, and will be found from May to September, in wet banks, in woods, and in moist pastures, and should not be gathered when wet with dew, or soon after rain ; if gathered dry, they will keep several months.
Page 175 - As the fig enlarges, the flower comes to maturity in concealment, and in eastern countries the fruit is improved by a singular operation called caprification. This is performed by suspending by threads, above the cultivated figs, branches of the wild fig, which are full of a species of cynips. When the insect has become winged, it quits the wild...
Page 143 - The leaves have a more penetrating smell than any of the other mints, and a much warmer, pungent, glowing taste like pepper, sinking as it were into the tongue. The principal use of this herb is in flatulent colics, languors, and other like disorders; it seems to act as soon as taken, and extends its effects through the whole system, instantly communicating a glowing warmth. Water...
Page 150 - ... face of the stock downwards, and a similar one in the scion upwards. The tongue or wedge-like process, forming the upper part of the sloping face of the scion, is then inserted downwards in the cleft of the stock ; the inner barks of both being brought closely to unite on one side so as not to be displaced...
Page 139 - A NATIVE of many countries in the northern parts of Europe. It is biennial, and propagated by sowing the seeds in Spring The seeds of this plant are well known to have a pleasant, spicy smell, and a warm, aromatic taste ; and on that account they are much used as a common ingredient in cakes, and are encrusted in sugar for comfits ; they are also distilled with spirituous liquors, to improve their flavor.

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