Famous Impostors

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The Minerva Group, Inc., Aug 1, 2003 - True Crime - 364 pages
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The subject of imposture is always an interesting one, and impostors in one shape or another are likely to flourish as long as human nature remains what it is, and society shows itself ready to be gulled. The histories of famous cases of imposture in this book have been grouped together to show that the art has been practiced in many forms - impersonators, pretenders, swindlers, and humbugs of all kinds; those who have masqueraded in order to acquire wealth, position, or fame, and those who have done so merely for the love of the art. Bram Abraham Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Dublin, Ireland. Although best known for Dracula, Stoker wrote eighteen books. Stoker coined the term "undead," and his interpretation of vampire folklore has powerfully shaped depictions of the legendary monsters ever since.
 

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Contents

A Perkin Warbeck
13
Stepban Mali 81
36
A Paracelsus
71
B Cagliostro
80
Mesmer
95
THE WANDERING JEW
107
JOHN LAW
123
ARTHUR ORTON Tichborne claimant
201
WOMEN AS MEN
227
CHAPTER PAOE
249
CHEVALIER oEow
269
THE BISLZT BOY
283
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About the author (2003)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland on November 8, 1847. He was educated at Trinity College. He worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He wrote 15 works of fiction including Dracula, The Lady of the Shroud, and The Lair of the White Worm, which was made into film. He died on April 20, 1912.

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