Far from the Madding Crowd

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The Floating Press, May 1, 2009 - Fiction - 771 pages
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Far from the Madding Crowd (1874) is the love story between the good shepherd Gabriel Oak and the proud heiress Bathsheba Everdene. Bathsheba scorns Gabriel's first bald proposal, and many years pass, seeing their positions in society change, as well as their relationship to each other. Bathsheba must see the tragic consequences of her easy use of others before she understands who her truest friend is.
 

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Contents

Chapter XXX Hot Cheeks and Tearful Eyes
339
Chapter XXXI BlameFury
348
Chapter XXXII NightHorses Tramping
362
Chapter XXXIII In the SunA Harbinger
377
Chapter XXXIV Home AgainA Trickster
391
Chapter XXXV At an Upper Window
411
Chapter XXXVI Wealth in JeopardyThe Revel
418
Chapter XXXVII The StormThe Two Together
432

Chapter VIII The MalthouseThe ChatNews
93
Chapter IX The HomesteadA VisitorHalfConfidences
124
Chapter X Mistress and Men
135
Chapter XI Outside the Barracks SnowA Meeting
147
Chapter XII FarmersA Rule An Exception
157
Chapter XIII Sortes Sanctorum The Valentine
166
Chapter XIV Effect of the Letter Sunrise
174
Chapter XV A Morning Meeting The Letter Again
181
Chapter XVI All Saints and All Souls
199
Chapter XVII In the MarketPlace
204
Chapter XVIII Boldwood in MeditationRegret
208
Chapter XIX The SheepWashing The Offer
215
Chapter XX PerplexityGrinding the ShearsA Quarrel
225
Chapter XXI Troubles in the Fold A Message
236
Chapter XXII The Great Barn and the SheepShearers
248
Chapter XXIII EventideA Second Declaration
265
Chapter XXIV The Same Night The Fir Plantation
276
Chapter XXV The New Acquaintance Described
288
Chapter XXVI Scene on the Verge of the HayMead
294
Chapter XXVII Hiving the Bees
311
Chapter XXVIII The Hollow Amid the Ferns
317
Chapter XXIX Particulars of a Twilight Walk
327
Chapter XXXVIII RainOne Solitary Meets Another
444
Chapter XXXIX Coming Home A Cry
451
Chapter XL On Casterbridge Highway
459
Chapter XLI SuspicionFanny is Sent For
470
Chapter XLII Joseph and His BurdenBucks Head
489
Chapter XLIII Fannys Revenge
507
Chapter XLIV Under a Tree Reaction
523
Chapter XLV Troys Romanticism
535
Its Doings
542
Chapter XLVII Adventures by the Shore
554
Chapter XLVIII Doubts Arise Doubts Linger
559
Chapter XLIX Oaks Advancement A Great Hope
568
Chapter L The Sheep FairTroy Touches His Wifes Hand
577
Chapter LI Bathsheba Talks with Her Outrider
599
Chapter LII Converging Courses
613
Chapter LIII ConcurriturHorae Momento
630
Chapter LIV After the Shock
650
Chapter LV The March Following Bathsheba Boldwood
657
Chapter LVI Beauty in Loneliness After All
665
Chapter LVII A Foggy Night and MorningConclusion
681
Endnotes
691
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About the author (2009)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, in Higher Bockhampton, England. The eldest child of Thomas and Jemima, Hardy studied Latin, French, and architecture in school. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield. He also began writing poetry. How I Built Myself a House, Hardy's first professional article, was published in 1865. Two years later, while still working in the architecture field, Hardy wrote the unpublished novel The Poor Man and the Lady. During the next five years, Hardy penned Desperate Remedies, Under the Greenwood Tree, and A Pair of Blue Eyes. In 1873, Hardy decided it was time to relinquish his architecture career and concentrate on writing full-time. In September 1874, his first book as a full-time author, Far from the Madding Crowd, appeared serially. After publishing more than two dozen novels, one of the last being Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hardy returned to writing poetry--his first love. Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in Dorchester, England. His house, Max Gate, was designed by Hardy, who also supervised its construction. Hardy died on January 11, 1928. His ashes are buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey.

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