Far from the Madding Crowd

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Oxford University Press, 1993 - English fiction - 468 pages
74 Reviews
Far from the Madding Crowd was the first of Hardy's novels to apply the name of Wessex to the landscape of south-west England, and the first to gain him widespread popularity as a novelist. When the beautiful and spirited Bathsheba Everdene inherits her own farm, she attracts three very different suitors; the seemingly commonplace man-of-the-soil Gabriel Oak, the dashing young soldier Francis Troy, and the respectable, middle-aged Farmer Boldwood. Her choice, and the tragedy it provokes, lie at the centre of Hardy's ambivalent story. This edition presents a new text of the novel restoring several manuscript passages never before published with the novel and many of the 1901 revisions missing from nearly all modern versions.

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User Review  - Gayle_C._Bull - LibraryThing

There are a few classic writers who had a gift for seeing through the cultural norms of their own times and captured people's humanity without judgement. Thomas Hardy is one of those writers. In this ... Read full review

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User Review  - sometimeunderwater - LibraryThing

I’m still working my way through Hardy’s novels one-by-one, having purchased a vintage set off eBay after a few late-night drinks. This one was less depressing (Jude) and less epic (Tess) than Hardy’s ... Read full review

Contents

General Editors Preface
ix
Note on the Text
xxix
Select Bibliography
xxxvii
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, in Higher Bockhampton, England. The eldest child of Thomas and Jemima, Hardy studied Latin, French, and architecture in school. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield. He also began writing poetry. How I Built Myself a House, Hardy's first professional article, was published in 1865. Two years later, while still working in the architecture field, Hardy wrote the unpublished novel The Poor Man and the Lady. During the next five years, Hardy penned Desperate Remedies, Under the Greenwood Tree, and A Pair of Blue Eyes. In 1873, Hardy decided it was time to relinquish his architecture career and concentrate on writing full-time. In September 1874, his first book as a full-time author, Far from the Madding Crowd, appeared serially. After publishing more than two dozen novels, one of the last being Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hardy returned to writing poetry--his first love. Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in Dorchester, England. His house, Max Gate, was designed by Hardy, who also supervised its construction. Hardy died on January 11, 1928. His ashes are buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey.

Falck-Yi is Teacher of English at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Simon Gatrell is Professor of English at the University of Georgia. Nancy Barrineau is Associate Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Margaret R. Higonnet is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Connecticut.

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