Farewell Miss Julie Logan: A Barrie Omnibus

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Canongate Books, Jul 1, 2010 - Fiction - 320 pages
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Edited and introduced by Andrew Nash. This selection of J M Barrie’s work covers three different genres and all the most telling themes found in his writing: Scotland, childhood, fantasy and sentimentality, sexual anxiety, theatrical invention, social comedy and proto-feminism. The disturbing prose fable of The Little White Bird contains the first and most original exploration of the Peter Pan theme, properly set in the wider context of a middle-aged man’s engagement with creation, fantasy and loneliness—a theme which made Barrie world-famous and haunted him for the rest of his life. In a one-act play of scintillating satire, The Twelve-Pound Look exposes the pomposities of male pride and public success in 1910 from the point of view of an ex-wife unexpectedly returned as her (be)knighted husband’s typist. Written in diary form and telling of an uncanny romance in a remote winter glen, Farewell Miss Julie Logan evokes the author’s fascination with longing, death and loss in a novella which can stand with the stories of the supernatural and which itself raises questions about the nature of romance fiction. This volume offers an exciting reassessment of one of Scotland’s most unusual and misrepresented writers. ‘Barrie can justly be called a pioneer of modern fantasy.’ The Times
 

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Contents

David and I Set Forth upon a Journey
7
The Little Nursery Governess
14
Her Marriage Her Clothes Her Appetite and an Inventory of Her Furniture
22
A Nightpiece
31
The Fight for Timothy
37
A Shock
45
The Last of Timothy
49
The Inconsiderate Waiter
53
Lockout Time
117
The Little House
128
Peters Goat
144
An Interloper
154
David and Porthos Compared
158
William Paterson
165
Joey
173
Pilkingtons
181

A Confirmed Spinster
64
Sporting Reflections
71
The Runaway Perambulator
73
The Pleasantest Club in London
82
The Grand Tour of the Gardens
90
Peter Pan
99
The Thrushs Nest
108
Barbara
190
The Cricket Match
198
The Dedication
201
Explanatory Notes
210
Textual Notes
215
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About the author (2010)

James Matthew Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan, was born on May 9, 1860, in Kirriemuir, Angus, Scotland. His idyllic boyhood was shattered by his brother's death when Barrie was six. His own grief and that of his mother influenced the rest of his life. Through his work, he sought to recapture the carefree joy of his first six years. Barrie came to London as a freelance writer in 1885. His early fiction, Auld Licht Idylls (1888) and A Window in Thrums (1889), were inspired by his youth in Kirriemuir. After publishing a biography of his mother Margaret Ogilvy and the autobiographical novel Sentimental Tommy, about a boy living in a dream world (1896), he concentrated on writing plays. The Admirable Crichton (1902), the story of a butler who becomes king of a desert island, helped to establish Barrie's reputation as a playwright. Meanwhile, he began to relive his childhood by telling the first Peter Pan stories to the sons of his friend, Sylvia Llewellyn Davies. The play Peter Pan was first performed in 1904 and published as a novel seven years later. Its imaginative drama, featuring the eternal boy's triumph over the grownup Captain Hook, idealizes childhood and underscores adults' inability to regain it. These resonant themes made it a classic of world literature. Barrie's later work shows his increasingly cynical view of adulthood, particularly in Dear Brutus (1917). Often considered his finest play, it concerns nine men and women whose caprices destroy a miraculous opportunity to relive their lives. Barrie married the former Mary Ansell in 1894. They divorced in 1909, never having any children. Barrie died in London on June 19, 1937.

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