Farthest North: Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship Fram, 1893-96, and of a Fifteen Months' Sleigh Journey

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Cambridge University Press, May 15, 2011 - History - 652 pages
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Originally published in 1897, this two-volume work chronicles the polar expedition of Norwegian scientist Fridtjof Nansen (1861-1930), who came closer than any previous explorer to the North Pole. Beginning on board his boat, the Fram, which was deliberately driven into pack-ice off Siberia in order to drift north, Nansen and his companions later resorted to sleds and kayaks. Running to over six hundred pages, Volume 1 includes descriptions of the expedition's preparation and equipment, the farewell to Norway and voyage through the Kara Sea, ending with the party's second autumn on the ice. The Fram served as an oceanographic-meteorological-biological laboratory during its time in the Arctic and Nansen eventually published six volumes of scientific observations. He later became Norwegian delegate to the League of Nations, directing humanitarian projects, and is famous for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 as well as for his polar achievements.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER II
54
THE START
82
CHAPTER IV
98
OYAGE THROUGH THE KARA SEA
134
CHAPTER VI
209
THE SPRING AND SUMMER OF 1894
393
CHAPTER VIII
453
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About the author (2011)

Fridtjof Nansen made early contributions to neuron doctrine and was the discoverer of "dead water." He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work as a high commissioner of the League of Nations.

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