Father Abbey's Will: To which is Added A Letter of Courtship to His Virtuous and Amiable Widow, with Historical and Biographical Notes

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Privately printed, 1854 - American wit and humor - 14 pages
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Page 14 - A servant with this clause makes drudgery divine; who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, makes that and the action fine.
Page 14 - TEACH me, my God and King, In all things Thee to see, And what I do in anything To do it as for Thee.
Page 6 - A chafing dish, With one salt fish, If I am not mistaken, A leg of pork, A broken fork, And half a flitch of bacon. A spinning wheel, One peck of meal, A knife without a handle, A rusty lamp, Two quarts of samp, And half a tallow candle. My pouch and pipes, Two oxen tripes, An oaken dish well carved, My little dog And spotted hog, With two young pigs just starved. This is my store, I have no more, I heartily do give it, My years are spun, My days are done, And so I think to leave it. Thus father...
Page 5 - TO my dear wife, My joy and life I freely now do give her My whole estate, With all my plate, Being just about to leave her My tub of soap, A long cart rope, A frying pan and kettle, An ashes pail, A threshing flail, An iron wedge und beetle.
Page 12 - As love softens the mind and disposes to poetry, he has eas'd himself in the following strains, which he transmits to the charming widow, as the first essay of his love and courtship. MISTRESS Abbey To you I fly. You only can relieve me, To you I turn. For you I burn, If you will but believe me. Then gentle dame, Admit my flame, And grant me my petition, If you deny, Alas ! I die.
Page 12 - Fortune to me has granted In equal store, I've one thing more Which Matthew long had wanted. No teeth 'tis true You have to shew, The young think teeth inviting; But, silly youths! I love those mouths Where there's no fear of biting.
Page 6 - Striped down with red, A bag of rags to patch it. A ragged mat, A tub of fat, A book put out by Bunyan, Another book By Robin Cook, A skein or two of spunyarn.
Page 12 - ... MISTRESS Abbey To you I fly, You only can relieve me To you I turn, For you I burn, If you will but believe me. Then gentle dame Admit my flame, And grant me my petition; If you deny, Alas ! I die, In pitiful condition. Before the news Of your dear spouse Had reached us at New Haven, My dear wife died, Who was my bride, In anno eighty-seven.
Page 12 - The young think teeth inviting. But, silly youths! I love those mouths Where there's no fear of biting. A leaky eye, That's never dry, These woful times is fitting. A wrinkled face Adds solemn grace To folks devout at meeting. A furrowed brow, Where corn might grow, Such fertile soil is seen in 't, A long hook nose, Though scorned by foes, For spectacles convenient.
Page 5 - A little mug, A two quart jug, A bottle full of brandy, A looking glass To see your face, You'll find it very handy. A musket true, As ever flew, A pound of shot and wallet, A leather sash, My calabash, My powder-horn and bullet.

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