Fatherloss: How Sons of All Ages Come to Terms with the Death of Their Dads

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Hyperion, Jan 10, 2001 - Self-Help - 304 pages
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The first of its kind: a compassionate exploration of how men deal with the deaths of their fathers.

With Hope Edelman's Motherless Daughters, millions of women found comfort in the experiences of other women who had lost their mothers. But until now, no book has been available to guide men through what can be an equally wrenching and life-changing event. Based on a landmark national survey of 300 men, and in-depth interviews with 70 others, FatherLoss is the first book that focuses specifically on how sons cope with the deaths of their dads. Chethik offers rich portraits of a variety of father-son relationships, and focuses on how the death of a father affects sons differently, depending on when in their lives it occurs. He also explores how such cultural figures as Ernest Hemingway, Dwight Eisenhower, and Michael Jordan were affected by the loss of their fathers.

By weaving together the poignant experiences of diverse men and the results of his groundbreaking survey, Chethik offers fresh insight into the unique male grieving process, encouraging men to share an experience too many have been conditioned to endure in silence.

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FatherLoss: how sons of all ages come to terms with the deaths of their dads

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Men have been accused of being incapable of grieving when, in truth, says writer/speaker Chethik, they have not been allowed to do so. Billed as a counterpart to Hope Edelman's superior Motherless ... Read full review

Contents

John F Kennedy Jr
13
Michael Jordan
42
Dylan Thomas
66
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Neil Chethik is an author, speaker, and writer-in-residence at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in Lexington, Kentucky. His first book, "FatherLoss, " was published in 2001. He lives with his wife and son in Kentucky.

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