Fathers and Sons

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Penguin UK, Sep 24, 2009 - Fiction - 240 pages
21 Reviews
When Arkady Petrovich comes home from college, his father finds his eager, naive son changed almost beyond recognition, for the impressionable Arkady has fallen under the powerful influence of the friend he has brought with him. A self-proclaimed nihilist, the ardent young Bazarov shocks Arkady's father by criticizing the landowning way of life and by his outspoken determination to sweep away traditional values of contemporary Russian society. Turgenev's depiction of the conflict between generations and their ideals stunned readers when Fathers and Sons was first published in 1862. But many could also sympathize with Arkady's fascination with its nihilist hero whose story vividly captures the hopes and regrets of a changing Russia.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AnneBrooke - LibraryThing

I'm normally a fan of all Frayn's work and count him as one of the best living writers we have. However, I'm sorry to say this book is on the whole a significant error of judgement in a wide variety ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ma_Washigeri - LibraryThing

Enjoyed the Bruegel mystery tour very much, and the first third of the book while it was setting the scene. But for me the farce of the last third of the book didn't really succeed and I did skip over quite a bit of the last few chapters, wanting to hear the plot but not all the detail. Read full review

Contents

Chronology
Further Reading
Afterword
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev was born in 1818 in the province of Oryol. In 1827 he entered St Petersburg University where he studied philosophy. When he was nineteen he published his first poems and went to the University of Berlin. After two years he returned to Russia and took his degree at the University of Moscow. After 1856 he lived mostly abroad, and he became the first Russian writer to gain a wide reputation in Europe. He wrote many novels, plays, short stories and novellas, of which First Love (1860) is the most famous. He died in Paris in 1883.

Peter Carson learned Russian during National Service in the Navy at the Joint Services School for Linguistics, Crail and London, and at home - his mother's family left Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution. His working life has been spent on the editorial side of London publishing.

Rosamund Bartlett lectures in Russian and music at the University of Durham. The author of Wagner and Russia (1995), Literary Russia: A Guide (with Anna Benn, 1997) and Chekhov: Scenes from a Life (2004), she has edited a collection of essays about Shostakovich and published numerous articles on aspects of Russian cultural history. She has also completed new translations of a selection of Chekhov1s short stories, About Love and Other Stories (2004).

Tatiana Tolstaya was born in Leningrad in 1951 to an aristocratic family that includes the writers Leo and Alexei Tolstoy. She has published, among other books, a novel, The Slynx, and a collection of short stories, White Walls.

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