Faust, Part 1

Front Cover
Digireads.com, Jan 31, 2005 - Drama - 124 pages
The Faustian legend has captured the imagination of readers and writers for centuries and in Goethe's "Faust" we find one of the greatest tellings of this old German tale. It is the story of man who makes a deal with the devil and pays with his soul. The influence of this theme on literature cannot be understated. In Goethe's "Faust" we find what is probably the most famous version of the story and one of the greatest works of literature ever written.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DanielSTJ - www.librarything.com

An impressive drama. It was filled, and fused, with so many themes, characters, allusions, references, and poetic prowess. This was Goethe near the height of his powers. I read the drama WAY after ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - VicCavalli - www.librarything.com

Part One of Faust was one of the few books in my life that forced me to put on a pot of coffee and give up a night's sleep to finish it. The young Goethe simply nailed it. When I then got a hold of ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
17
Section 4
25
Section 5
43
Section 6
59
Section 7
74
Section 8
98
Section 12
178
Section 13
186
Section 14
199
Section 15
202
Section 16
225
Section 17
301
Section 18
316
Section 19
329

Section 9
135
Section 10
155
Section 11
169
Section 20
344
Section 21
362
Section 22
364

About the author (2005)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) perhaps comes as close as any man to deserving the title of universal genius. Poet, dramatist, critic, scientist, administrator and novelist, he was born at Frankfurt-am-Main in 1749, the son of well-to-do parents with intellectual interests; and he studied at the University of Leipzig and at Strassburg, where he wrote a play which initiated the important Sturm und Drang movement. During the next five years he practiced law in Frankfurt and wrote The Sorrows of Young Werther, a remarkable novel autobiographical of one side of Goethe's nature. In 1775 he went to visit the court of the young Duke of Weimar, and, except for an extended journey to Italy a decade later, stayed there the rest of his life, filling at one time or another all the major posts in the Weimar government. Here a close friendship with Schiller developed, and here he conducted important scientific experiments and published a steady stream of books of the highest order and in many different forms. He became the director of the Weimar Theatre in 1791 and made it the most famous in Europe. His life held a number of ardent loves, which he celebrated in lyrics that are compared to Shakespeare's, and in 1806 he married Christiane Vulpius whom he had loved for many years. In later life Goethe became a generous patron of younger writers, including Byron and Carlyle. In 1790 he published the first version of his life work as Faust, a Fragment, but Part I of the completed Faust did not appear until 1808, while Part II was finished and published only a few months before Goethe's death in 1832.

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