Faust

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1862
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User Review  - yesssman - LibraryThing

Well this will be in the category of Shakespeare as a classic that I will have to reread many times to truly appreciate. Certainly the power and uniqueness of Goethe's writing came through to me, as ... Read full review

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User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

There have been many writings of the Faust story; in this one, Goethe tries his hand at the fable. Faust sells his soul to the devil in return for some rather nebulous gains. The story is told in ... Read full review

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Page 28 - To die, to sleep; To sleep? perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause. There's the respect That makes calamity of so long life...
Page 22 - Thou art the anointed Cherub that covereth; and I have set thee so: thou wast upon the holy mountain of God; thou hast walked up and down in the midst of the stones of fire. Thou wast perfect in thy ways from the day that thou wast created, till iniquity was found in thee.
Page 25 - Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Page 203 - Not equal, as their sex not equal seem'd: For contemplation he and valour form'd; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace...
Page 203 - Substantial life, to have thee by my side Henceforth an individual solace dear: Part of my soul I seek thee, and thee claim My other half.' With that thy gentle hand Seized mine: I yielded, and from that time see How beauty is excelled by manly grace And wisdom, which alone is truly fair.
Page 146 - The practice of thrusting out the thumb between the first and second fingers to express the feelings of insult and contempt has prevailed very generally among the nations of Europe, and for many ages been denominated making the fig, or described at least by some equivalent expression.
Page 314 - Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark ; Liver of blaspheming Jew ; Gall of goat, and slips of yew Silver'd in the moon's eclipse ; Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips ; Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliver'd by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab ; Add thereto a tiger's chaudron, For the ingredients of our cauldron.
Page 314 - Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
Page 18 - And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof? And no man in heaven, nor in earth, neither under the earth, was able to open the book, neither to look thereon.
Page 18 - And I saw in the right hand of him that sat on the throne a book, written within and on the back side, sealed with seven seals. And I saw a strong angel proclaiming with a loud voice, "Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

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