Favorite Poems of Emily Dickinson

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Random House Value Publishing, Sep 30, 1987 - Poetry - 160 pages
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With her deceptively simple verses, Dickinson introduced a world of innovations in rhyme, meter, and metaphor. Over 100 of her best-known, best-loved poems appear here, including "Because I could not stop for Death," "Hope is the thing with feathers," "I heard a fly buzz when I died," "I'm nobody! Who are you?" and many more.

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Contents

LIFE I Success
19
Our share of night to bear
20
Rouge et Noir
21
Rouge gagne
22
Glee 1 the great storm is over
23
If I can stop one heart from breaking
24
Almost
25
A wounded deer leaps highest
26
The bee is not afraid of me
77
Summers Armies
78
The Grass
80
A little road not made of man
82
Summer Shower
83
Psalm of the Day
84
The Sea of Sunset
86
Purple Clover
87

The heart asks pleasure first
27
In a Library
28
Much madness is divinest sense
30
u I asked no other thing
31
Exclusion
32
The Secret
33
The Lonely House
34
To fight aloud is very brave
36
Dawn
37
The Book of Martyrs
38
The Mystery of Pain
39
I taste a liquor never brewed
40
A Book
41
I had no time to hate because
42
Unreturning
43
Whether my bark went down at sea
44
Belshazzar had a letter
45
The brain within its groove
46
LOVE I Mine
47
Bequest
48
Alter? When the hills do
49
Suspense
50
Surrender
51
If you were coming in the fall
52
With a Flower
54
Proof
55
Have you got a brook in your little heart?
56
Transplanted
57
The Outlet
58
In vain
59
Renunciation
62
Loves Baptism
64
Resurrection
66
Apocalypse
67
The Wife
68
Apotheosis
69
NATURE I New feet within my garden go
71
Mayflower
72
Why?
73
Perhaps youd like to buy a flower
74
The pedigree of honey
75
A Service of Song
76
The Bee
89
Presentiment is that long shadow
90
As children bid the guest goodnight
91
Angels in the early morning
92
So bashful when I spied her
93
Two Worlds
94
The Mountain
95
A Day
96
The butterflys assumptiongown
97
The Wind
98
Death and Life
100
T was later when the summer went
101
Indian Summer
102
Autumn
104
Beclouded
105
The Hemlock
106
Theres a certain slant of light
108
Too late
110
Setting sail
116
A Funeral
122
The First Lesson
132
The bustle in a house
133
I reason earth is short
134
Afraid? Of whom am I afraid?
135
Dying
136
Two swimmers wrestled on a spar
137
The Chariot
138
She went as quiet as the dew
140
Resurgam
141
Except to heaven she is nought
142
Death is a dialogue between
143
It was too late for man
144
Along the Potomac
145
The daisy follows soft the Sun
146
Emancipation
147
Lost
148
If I should nt be alive
149
Sleep is supposed to be 15
150
I shall know why when time is over
151
I never lost as much but twice
152
Copyright

About the author (1987)

Emily Dickinson was born December 10, 1830, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Although one of America's most acclaimed poets, the bulk of her work was not published until well after her death in 1886. The few poems published in her lifetime were not received with any great fanfare. After her death, Dickinson's sister Lavinia found over 1,700 poems Emily had written and stashed away in a drawer-the accumulation of a life's obsession with words. Critics have agreed that Dickinson's poetry was well ahead of its time. Today she is considered one of the best poets of the English language. Except for a year spent at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, Dickinson spent her entire life in the family home in Amherst, Massachusetts. She never married and began to withdraw from society, eventually becoming a recluse. Dickinson's poetry engages the reader and requires his or her participation. Full of highly charged metaphors, her free verse and choice of words are best understood when read aloud. Dickinson's punctuation and capitalization, not orthodox by Victorian standards and called "spasmodic" by her critics, give greater emphasis to her meanings

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