Fear of flying

Front Cover
H. Holt, 1983 - Fiction - 311 pages
30 Reviews
Originally published in 1973, the groundbreaking, uninhibited story of Isadora Wing and her desire to fly free caused a national sensation. In "The New York Times," Henry Miller compared it to his own classic, "Tropic of Cancer" and predicted that "this book will make literary history..." It has sold more than twelve million copies. Now, after thirty years, the revolutionary novel known as "Fear of Flying" still stands as a timeless tale of self-discovery, liberation, and womanhood.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

Jong makes us laugh at her fear and her various sexual escapades. This book allowed straight women to imagine going where only gay men had gone before. "The zipless fuck is absolutely pure. It is free ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Karin7 - LibraryThing

I hated this book, and that's all I'm going to say about it as I read it long ago. But I remember that I well and truly loathed it and if I hated a book that much now, I wouldn't bother finishing it. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
35
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

Born Erica Mann in 1942, Erica Jong was an award-winning poet, winning the American Academy of Poets Award in 1963 and publishing the critically acclaimed book of verse, Fruits and Vegetables (1971), before publishing her groundbreaking novel of female sexuality, Fear of Flying (1973). Her best-known works follow the sexual awakening and subsequent life and career of Isadora Zelda White Stollerman Wing; they begin with Flying, and continue with How to Save Your Own Life (1977) and Parachutes and Kisses (1984). In the 1960s, before she achieved success as a writer, Jong taught English at the City College of City University of New York and spent time in Germany as a faculty member of the University of Maryland, overseas division, in Heidelberg. In 1995, she was a judge in fiction for the National Book Awards.

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