Federal Constitutions and International Relations

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Macmillan, 2001 - Fiction - 164 pages
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In an age of globalisation the foreign relations powers of federal governments have assumed great prominence. This is the first analysis of this controversial topic to examine the external affairs of the Australian federal government in an international context. Jurisdictions examined include Australia, the United Stated, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, India, and Malaysia. This wide-ranging international perspective provides an extended journey into comparative constitutional law. Further, it argues that the federal division of legislative power in the absence of treaty should not govern the implementation of treaties in a federal system. A full index and table of cases are included.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DOMESTIC LEGAL INCAPACITY
8
ORIGINAL INTENTIONS
21
THE ROLE OF SUBNATIONAL GOVERNMENTS
30
THE DOMESTIC LEGAL STATUS OF TREATIES
67
FRAGMENTED TREATY IMPLEMENTATION IN FEDERAL STATES
76
UNIFIED TREATY IMPLEMENTATION IN FEDERAL STATES
87
CONSTITUTIONAL GUARANTEES
115
CONFORMITY REQUIREMENTS
143
CONCLUSION
155
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

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