Federalism: or The question of exclusive power, the true issue in the present monetary and political discussions in the United States

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U.P. James, 1841 - Business & Economics - 68 pages
 

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Page 67 - To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof. Section 9. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to...
Page 66 - States provides that the Congress shall have power — To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard' of weights and measures: To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States.
Page 67 - The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year 1808; but a tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.
Page 48 - Constitution from abundant caution has. declared, "that the migration or importation of such persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808.
Page 67 - to exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of government of the United States...
Page 9 - ... to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into effect the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by the Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof," and also to provide for calling forth the militia for executing the laws of the Union.
Page 8 - It was adopted, as declared in its preamble, " to form a more perfect Union, to establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, to promote the general welfare and to secure the blessings of liberty to the people who ordained it, and their posterity.
Page 8 - States ; — to coin money, regulate the value thereof and of foreign coins, and to fix the standard of weights and measures...
Page 9 - Congress, by its declaration that " this Constitution and the laws made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made or which shall be made under authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land.
Page 68 - the Constitution, and the laws of the United States, made in pursuance thereof, shall be the supreme law of the land, any thing in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

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