Feeding the German Eagle: Soviet Economic Aid to Nazi Germany, 1933-1941

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - Business & Economics - 265 pages

The dramatic story of Hitler and Stalin's marriage of convenience has been recounted frequently over the past 60 years, but with remarkably little consensus. As the first English-language study to analyze the development, extent, and importance of the Nazi-Soviet economic relationship from Hitler's ascension to power to the launching of Operation Barbarossa in June 1941, this book highlights the crucial role that Soviet economic aid played in Germany's early successes in World War II. When Hitler's rearmament efforts left Germany dangerously short of raw materials in 1939, Stalin was able to offer valuable supplies of oil, manganese, grain, and rubber. In exchange, the Soviet Union would gain territory and obtain the technology and equipment necessary for its own rearmament efforts.

However, by the summer of 1941, Stalin's well-calculated plan had gone awry. Germany's continuing reliance on Soviet raw materials would, Stalin hoped, convince Hitler that he could not afford to invade the USSR. As a result, the Soviets continued to supply the Reich with the resources that would later carry the Wehrmacht to the gates of Moscow and nearly cost the Soviets the war. The extensive use in this study of neglected source material in the German archives helps resolve the long-standing debate over whether Stalin's foreign policy was one of expansionism or appeasement.

 

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Contents

VIII
11
IX
12
X
14
XI
15
XII
17
XIII
19
XIV
23
XV
24
XLVII
106
XLVIII
109
XLIX
111
L
113
LI
114
LII
117
LIII
118
LIV
123

XVI
26
XVII
28
XVIII
31
XIX
34
XX
36
XXI
41
XXII
43
XXIII
46
XXIV
47
XXV
50
XXVI
53
XXVII
55
XXVIII
56
XXIX
58
XXX
61
XXXI
63
XXXII
65
XXXIII
69
XXXIV
72
XXXV
77
XXXVI
79
XXXVII
81
XXXVIII
82
XXXIX
85
XL
88
XLI
90
XLII
93
XLIII
97
XLIV
100
XLV
103
XLVI
104
LV
125
LVI
126
LVII
128
LVIII
129
LIX
133
LX
135
LXI
137
LXII
139
LXIII
143
LXIV
145
LXV
149
LXVI
150
LXVII
153
LXVIII
159
LXIX
161
LXX
163
LXXI
165
LXXII
169
LXXIII
170
LXXIV
171
LXXV
173
LXXVI
175
LXXVII
179
LXXVIII
183
LXXIX
185
LXXX
222
LXXXI
227
LXXXII
241
LXXXIII
255
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Page 13 - All classes in Germany are looking towards Russia for one reason or another. The extremists of the Left look upon her as the realization of their own political ideals; the pan-Germans look upon her as providing the only possible outlet for surplus population and compensation for the loss of colonies. Officers think that she may provide employment, which is no longer possible in their own country. Industrialists think that she will provide employment for capital and ultimately be the means of paying...

About the author (1999)

EDWARD E. ERICSON III is Chairman of the Department of History at John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas./e He has published articles and reviews in a variety of historical and general journals.

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