Feedstock recycling and pyrolysis of waste plastics: converting waste plastics into diesel and other fuels

Cover
J. Wiley & Sons, 2006 - 785 Seiten
0 Rezensionen
Pyrolysis is a recycling technique converting plastic waste into fuels, monomers, or other valuable materials by thermal and catalytic cracking processes. It allows the treatment of mixed, unwashed plastic wastes. For many years research has been carried out on thermally converting waste plastics into useful hydrocarbons liquids such as crude oil and diesel fuel. Recently the technology has matured to the point where commercial plants are now available. Pyrolysis recycling of mixed waste plastics into generator and transportation fuels is seen as the answer for recovering value from unwashed, mixed plastics and achieving their desired diversion from landfill.

This book provides an overview of the science and technology of pyrolysis of waste plastics. It describes the types of plastics that are suitable for pyrolysis recycling, the mechanism of pyrolytic degradation of various plastics, characterization of the pyrolysis products and details of commercially mature pyrolysis technologies. This book also covers co-pyrolysis technology, including: waste plastic/waste oil, waste plastics/coal, and waste plastics/rubber.

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Contributors
3
Thermal and Catalytic Conversion of Poly olefins
4
Materials Process Engineering 76344 EggensteinLeopoldshafen
5
Pyrolysis of Plastics and Rubber
6
Feedstock Recycling
22
Conclusions
39
Primary Reaction
45
Polystyrene Cracking
54
Summary and Conclusions
358
Mohammad Farhat Ali
363
The Characteristics and Chemical Structure of Plastics
364
Pyrolysis
374
Escola Lexington
380
Overview of Commercial Pyrolysis Processes for Waste
383
Operational Considerations
392
Fluidized Bed Pyrolysis of Plastic Wastes
435

Hydrocracking Processes
60
Conclusions
67
Catalytic Upgrading of Plastic Wastes
73
Catalytic Systems
79
Reactors
85
Influence of the Main Operation Variables
92
Coprocessing
101
Introduction
112
Reactor Design
120
Thermal and Catalytic Degradation of Waste HDPE
129
Total Mass Balance
136
Various Catalysts
144
Fractional Distillation of Products
153
Development of a Process for the Continuous Conversion
161
Upgrading of Wasteplasticsderived Heavy Oil Over Catalysts
172
REY Zeolites
180
Catalytic Degradation of Plastic Waste to Fuel over Microporous
193
Initial Degradation Mechanism
199
References
206
Conclusions
221
Catalysts
239
Production of Gaseous and Liquid Fuels by Pyrolysis
251
Technological Approach
271
References
280
Hideaki Tachibana Paul T Williams
285
Feedstock Recycling of Plastics
288
Conclusions
309
Composition of Liquid Fuels Derived from the Pyrolysis
315
Pyrolysis Products of Packaging Waste Plastics
321
Production of Premium Oil Products from Waste Plastic
345
Conversion of Waste Plastic to Lubricating Base Oil
351
Different Stages in the Fluidizedbed Pyrolysis of a Plastic Waste
444
Operability Range of Fluidizedbed Pyrolysers
453
The Hamburg Fluidizedbed Pyrolysis Process to Recycle
475
Pyrolysis Product Composition
482
References
490
Experimental and Analytical Methods
496
Liquefaction with Commingled Plastics and Dechlorination
502
Pilot Plant Scale Studies for the Liquefaction of PVC Mixed
523
Liquid Fuel from Plastic Wastes Using ExtrusionRotary Kiln
531
References
547
Rotary Kiln Principles
553
Dehalogenation of Pyrolysis Oils
562
Microwave Pyrolysis of Plastic Wastes
569
Microwave Pyrolysis of Plastics in the Scientific Literature
575
Kazuhiko Tada
592
Continuous Thermal Process for Cracking Polyolefin Wastes
595
Waste Plastic Pyrolysis in FreeFail Reactors
605
Plastic Waste Recycling
612
References
621
Monomer Recovery of Plastic Waste in a Fluidized Bed Process
627
Pyrolysis of Polystyrene
635
Physical Recycling Mechanical Recycling
643
References
659
The Liquefaction of Plastic Containers and Packaging
665
Process and Equipment for Conversions of Waste Plastics into
709
Pyrolysis Catalyst
715
Process of Plastics Pyrolysis
738
Pyrolysis of PVC
747
Index
757
Urheberrecht

Über den Autor (2006)

John Scheirs is a polymer research specialist with broad interests in polystyrenes and styrenic copolymers.  He is the principal consultant with ExcelPlas, a polymer consulting company.  John was born in 1965 in Melbourne and studies applied chemistry at the University of Melbourne.  He has worked on projects concerning the fracture, stress cracking, processing, characterization and recycling of styrenic polymers.  John has authored over 50 scientific papers, including 8 encyclopedia chapters, and a number of books on polymer analysis and polymer recycling.

Professor Walter Kaminsky studied chemistry at the University of Hamburg. Since 1979 he has been a full professor for technical and macromolecular chemistry at the University of Hamburg. He supervises a group of 20 students and scientists in the field of metallocene/MAO catalysis and a group in the field of recycling of plastics and scrap tires by pyrolysis. He was President of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh), Hamburg section, Dean of the faculty of chemistry at the University of Hamburg, Director of the Institute for Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, and is a member of the GDCh, DECHEMA, Naturforscher und Ärzte, Verein deutscher Ingenieure, and American Chemical Society. He has published more than 200 papers/books and holds 20 patents. He has organized several international symposia in the field of olefin polymerization and pyrolysis of polymer wastes. He is advisor for authorities and companies in the fields of metallocene catalysts, polymerization of olefins, and recycling of plastics and environmental protection.

Bibliografische Informationen