Female biography, Volume 2

Front Cover
no. 37, South second-street. Fry and Kammerer, printers, 1807 - Women
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 223 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it; And what the word did make it, That I believe, and take it.
Page 347 - Her heroism was exempt from temerity, her frugality from avarice, her friendship from partiality, her active temper from turbulency and a vain ambition : She guarded not herself with equal care or equal success from lesser infirmities; the rivalship of beauty, the desire of admiration, the jealousy of love, and the sallies of anger.
Page 198 - Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot ? And he said unto me, Unto two thousand and three hundred days ; then shall the sanctuary be cleansed.
Page 498 - Reflections upon the conduct of human life with reference to the study of learning and knowledge ; in a letter to the excellent lady, the lady Masham,
Page 239 - Spanish, she readeth here now at Windsor more Greek every day than some prebendary of this church doth read Latin in a whole week. And that which is most praiseworthy of all, within the walls of her privy chamber, she hath obtained that...
Page 369 - Bui-net, •who styles her a wise and worthy woman, says, that " She was more likely to have maintained the post (of protector) than either of her brothers," according to a saying that went of her, " That those who wore breeches, deserved petticoats better ; but if those in petticoats had been in breeches, they would have held faster.
Page 347 - ... over her. In her family, in her court, in her kingdom, she remained equally mistress : The force of the tender passions was great over her, but the force of her mind was still superior ; and the combat which her victory visibly cost her, serves only to display the firmness of her resolution, and the loftiness of her ambitious sentiments.
Page 147 - This pillar was erected in the year 1656, by Ann, Countess Dowager of Pembroke, &c. for a memorial of her last parting, in this place, with her good and pious mother, Margaret, Countess Dowager of Cumberland, on the 2d of April, 1616; in memory whereof she hath left an annuity of 41.
Page 393 - Guilford desired permission to see her ; but she refused her consent, and informed him by a message, that the tenderness of their parting would overcome the fortitude of both, and would too much unbend their minds from that constancy which their approaching end required of them. Their separation...
Page 200 - Much pains was taken by the Court to dispossess her of this spirit; but all would not do, till Lamb, then Dean of the Arches, shot her through and through, with an arrow borrowed from her own quiver...

Bibliographic information