Fifteen Poets of the Aztec World

Front Cover
Miguel Leon-Portilla
University of Oklahoma Press, 2000 - Poetry - 328 pages

Who were the poets of Mexico in the days of Aztec splendor? What were the poems of a culture so different from our own?

In this first English-language translation of a significant corpus of Nahuatl poetry into English, an expansion of his classic Trece poetas del mundo azteca, Miguel León-Portilla was assisted in his rethinking, augmenting, and rewriting in English by Grace Lobanov. Biographies of fifteen composers of Nahuatl verse and analyses of their work are followed by their extant poems in Nahuatl and in English.

The poets - fourteen men and one woman - lived in the central highlands of Mexico and spoke Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs, Texcocans, Tlaxcalans, and several other chiefdoms. These authors of "flower and song" (a Nahuatl metaphor for poetry, art, and symbolism) lived during the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. Sources for the poems included indigenous "codices," books of songs" now unfortunately lost, and renditions of them preserved by the Nahuatl oral tradition, which survived the Spanish Conquest and were recorded by several young natives in two manuscripts.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

Fifteen poets of the Aztec world

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In the centuries immediately prior to the Spanish conquest, an exquisite poetic tradition flourished among the Nahuatl speakers of the central Mexican highlands. The fragmentary remnants of this ... Read full review

Contents

Tochihuitzin Coyolchiuhqui
37
Axayacatl
155
Temilotzin of Tlatelolco
186
PART THREE POETS FROM THE REGION
197
Xayacamach of Tizatlan
224
Xicohtencatl the Elder
232
PART FOUR POETS OF CHALCOAMAQUEMECAN
244
A Last Word 283
285
Bibliography
297
Index

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Director of the Inter-American Indian Institute in Mexico City, Miguel León-Portilla is a significant young Mexican scholar. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees (summa cum laude) form Loyola University at Los Angeles and the Ph.D. from the National University of Mexico. La filosofía náhuatl: estudiada en sus fuentes, the Spanish version of this book, received high praise from both Mexican and American scholars.

Bibliographic information