Fifty is the New Fifty: Ten Life Lessons for Women in Second Adulthood

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Penguin, 2009 - Self-Help - 214 pages
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Ten lessons to maximize creativity and happiness in the second half of life

In this inspiring new book, Suzanne Braun Levine follows her groundbreaking Inventing the Rest of Our Lives with fresh insights, research, and practical advice on the challenges and unexpected rewards for women in their fifties and beyond. Rich with anecdotes from the front lines of self-reinvention, this book captures the voices of women who are confronting change, renegotiating their relationships, and discovering who they are now that they are finally grown up. Among the lessons are: ¬“No¬” is not a four-letter Word, on the energizing power of standing up for what you mean and what you want; Do unto yourself as you have been doing unto others, a new way of getting yourself to the top of the to-do list; and Your marriage can make it, reassurance that changing your outlook doesn¬'t have to mean walking away from your marriage. Shaped by Levine¬'s empathetic and lively voice, this book is about wisdom, survival, joy, and camaraderie. It reads like a conversation among women who know what they are talking about and want to share what they have discovered.
 

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Contents

Lesson One Fifty Is the New Fiftv
1
Lesson Two Nothing Changes if Nothing Changes
22
Lesson Three No Is Not a FourLetter Word
42
Lesson Four A Circle of Trust Is a Must
63
Lesson Five Every Crisis Creates a New Normal
85
Lesson Six Do Unto Yourself as You Have Been
104
Lesson Seven Age Is Not a Disease
125
Lesson Eight Your Marriage Can Make It
145
Lesson Nine You Do Know What You Want
160
Lesson Ten Both Is the New EitherOr
180
Bibliography
191
Index
207
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About the author (2009)

Suzanne Braun Levine is the author of three previous books. She was the first editor of Ms. magazine, where she worked for seventeen years. She was also the editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. A nationally recognized authority on women, media, and family issues, she lectures widely and has appeared on major television talk shows, including Oprah, Charlie Rose, and Today.

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