Fighting Phil: The Life and Military Career of Philip Henry Sheridan, General of the Army of the United States

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Lee and Shepard, 1889 - 380 pages
 

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Page 97 - Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper ? The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength : He goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; Neither turneth he back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, The glittering spear and the shield.
Page 357 - Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering south, The dust, like smoke from the cannon's mouth Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and faster, Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster; The heart of the steed and the heart of the master Were beating like prisoners...
Page 357 - Swept on, with his wild eye full of fire. But lo, he is nearing his heart's desire; He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray, With Sheridan only five miles away. The first that the General saw were the groups Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops; What was done? what to do? a glance told him both.
Page 358 - Temple of Fame — There, with the glorious General's name, Be it said in letters both bold and bright : "Here is the steed that saved the day, By carrying Sheridan into the fight, From Winchester — twenty miles away!
Page 178 - By direction of the President of the United States, the Departments of the Ohio, of the Cumberland, and of the Tennessee, will constitute the Military Division of the Mississippi.
Page 127 - Stanley, already distinguished for four successful battles, Island No. 10, May 27, before Corinth, luka, and the battle of Corinth, at this time in command of our ten regiments of cavalry, fought the enemy's forty regiments of cavalry, and held them at bay, and beat them wherever he could meet them. He ought to be made a Major General for his services, and also for the good of the service.
Page 260 - ... sheep. This destruction embraces the Luray Valley and Little Fort Valley, as well as the main Valley. A large number of horses have been obtained, a proper estimate of which I cannot now make. Lieutenant John R. Meigs, my engineer officer, was murdered beyond Harrisonburg, near Dayton. For this atrocious act all the houses within an area of five miles were burned.
Page 305 - It has also pleased our Heavenly Father to favor as well our citizens in their homes as our soldiers in their camps and our sailors on the rivers and seas with unusual health. He has largely augmented our free population by emancipation and by immigration, while He has opened to us new sources of wealth and has crowned the labor of our workingmen in every department of industry with abundant rewards.
Page 97 - Hast thou given the horse strength ? Hast thou clothed his neck with thunder ? Canst 'thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength : He goeth on to meet the armed men.
Page 356 - And wider still those billows of war Thundered along the horizon's bar; And louder yet into Winchester rolled The roar of that red sea uncontrolled...

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