Figs, Dates, Laurel, and Myrrh: Plants of the Bible and the Quran

Front Cover
Timber Press, Nov 1, 2007 - Gardening - 336 pages
0 Reviews

This book celebrates the plants of the Old Testament and New Testament, including the Apocrypha, and of the Quran. From acacia, the wood of the tabernacle, to wormwood, whose bitter leaves cured intestinal worms, 81 fascinating chapters—covering every plant that has a true botanical counterpart—tell the stories of the fruits and grains, grasses and trees, flowers and fragrances of ancient lore. The descriptions include the plants' botanical characteristics, habitat, uses, and literary context. With evocative quotations and revelatory interpretations, this information is all the more critical today as the traditional agrarian societies that knew the plants intimately become urbanized.

The unusually broad geographic range of this volume extends beyond Israel to encompass the Holy Land's biblical neighbors from southern Turkey to central Sudan and from Cyprus to the Iraq border.

Richly illustrated with extensive color photography and with a foreword by the incomparable Garrison Keillor, this delightful ecumenical botany offers the welcome tonic of a deep look into an enduring, shared natural heritage.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

Figs, dates, laurel, and myrrh: plants of the Bible and the Quran

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The enormous task of examining the diverse and sometimes speculative side of religious ethnobotany is well executed here. Musselman (botany & biological sciences, Old Dominion Univ.; Jordan in Bloom ... Read full review

Contents

Ladanum
166
Laurel
170
Leek
173
Lentil
175
Lily of the Field
178
Mandrake
181
Mint
184
Mulberry
186

Aloeswood
48
Apple
51
Barley
54
Beans
60
Bitter Herbs
64
Black Cumin
65
Bramble
68
Broom
70
Calamus
73
Cane
76
Caper
79
Carob
82
Cattail
85
Cedar of Lebanon
88
Cinnamon
94
Coriander
97
Cotton
100
Crown of Thorns
102
Cucumber
104
Cumin
107
Cypress
110
Date Palm
114
Dill
120
Ebony
122
Fig
125
Flax
130
Flower of the Field
133
Frankincense
136
Galbanum
139
Gall
140
Garlic
144
Ginger
146
Gourd
148
Grape
150
Henna
156
Hyssop
159
Ivy
163
Mustard
189
Myrrh
194
Myrtle
198
Nard
201
Nettle
203
Oak
206
Olive
210
Onion
216
Papyrus
218
Pine
221
Pistachio
226
Plane
228
Pomegranate
231
Poplar
235
Reed
238
Rose
241
Rose of Sharon
243
Rue
246
Saffron
248
Sycomore
251
Tamarisk
256
Tares
261
Terebinth
265
Thistle
270
Thornbush
274
Thyine
277
Tumbleweed
281
Walnut
284
Watermelon
286
Wheat
288
Wild Greens
306
Willow
308
Wormwood
311
References
315
Index to Verses in the Bible and the Quran
324
General Index
327
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Lytton John Musselman has studied Bible plants for three decades and has published numerous books and articles on their identification, symbolism, and use in the holy writings. He is Mary Payne Hogan Professor of Botany and chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. He also wrote Jordan in Bloom (2000), which was commissioned by Queen Rania Al-Abdullah. He has lived and worked in several Middle Eastern countries, including serving as a Fulbright professor at the American University in Beirut (he has held three Fulbright Awards); he travels to the Middle East annually. He is also interested in parasitic plants (and edits Haustorium, the newsletter for those interested in the biology of such plants) and quillworts (Isoetes). Also a field naturalist, he is the manager of the Old Dominion's Blackwater Ecologic Preserve.

Garrison Keillor is America’s favorite storyteller. For more than 35 years, as the host of A Prairie Home Companion, he has captivated millions of listeners with his weekly News from Lake Wobegon monologues. A Prairie Home Companion is heard on hundreds of public radio stations, as well as America One, the Armed Forces Networks, Sirius Satellite Radio, and via a live audio webcast. 
 
Keillor is also the author of several books and a frequent contributor to national publications including Time, The New Yorker, and National Geographic, in addition to writing his own syndicated column. He has been awarded a National Humanities Medal from the National Endowment of the Humanities. When not touring, he resides in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Bibliographic information