Figures of Speech: 60 Ways to Turn a Phrase

Front Cover
Writing is not like chemical engineering. The figures of speech should not be learned the same way as the periodic table of elements. This is because figures of speech are not about hypothetical structures in things, but about real potentialities within language and within ourselves. The "figurings" of speech reveal the apparently limitless plasticity of language itself. We are inescapably confronted with the intoxicating possibility that we can make language do for us almost anything we want. Or at least a Shakespeare can. The figures of speech help to see how he does it, and how we might.

Therefore, in the chapters presented in this volume, the quotations from Shakespeare, the Bible, and other sources are not presented to exemplify the definitions. Rather, the definitions are presented to lead to the quotations. And the quotations are there to show us how to do with language what we have not done before. They are there for imitation.
 

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User Review  - Leonard - Goodreads

Oh boy do I love this book. Just an absolute joy to read, and it's definitely made me a richer, better writer. The most enjoyable guide to rhetorical figures I've ever encountered. Read full review

Contents

Preface
2
To And or Not to And
5
Effective Misspelling
19
Missing Links and Headless Horsemen
27
Man Bites Dog
39
Reds in the Red
49
More Than Enough
61
There There
73
Repetition Again
83
Conclusion
97
Abbreviations
100
GlossaryIndex
101
Copyright

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