Filipino-American Postcolonial Psychology: Oppression, Colonial Mentality, and Decolonization

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AuthorHouse, 2011 - Psychology - 332 pages
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There are over 92 million Filipinos in the Philippines, where the legacies of Western colonialism continue to exist and propagate the message that anything Filipino is inferior to anything American or Western. Thus, many Filipinos dream of immigrating to various Western countries, mostly to the United States. Today, Filipinos have the second highest yearly immigration rate into the United States and compose the second largest immigrant group in the country. Also, Filipinos in America number over 3 million, making them the second largest Asian American ethnic group in the country. Not surprisingly, there has been increased attention on the experiences of Filipinos and Filipino Americans as minorities and immigrants, as well as toward better understanding their identity, cultural values, and mental health.However, given the conditions of postcolonial Philippines and the contemporary experiences of oppression by Filipinos in America, one cannot completely and accurately understand the minority, immigrant, and psychological experiences of this group outside the context of colonialism and contemporary oppression. Thus, this text focuses on the psychological effects of historical colonialism and contemporary oppression among Filipinos and Filipino Americans. It takes the reader from indigenous Tao culture, Spanish and American colonialism, colonial mentality or internalized oppression along with its implications on Kapwa, identity, and mental health, to decolonization in the clinical, community, and research settings.This book is a multidisciplinary and empirical approach to Filipino and Filipino American psychology. It is intended for the entire community, teachers, researchers, students, and service providers interested in or who are working with Filipinos and Filipino Americans, or those who are interested in the psychological consequences of colonialism and oppression. This book may serve as a tool for remembering the past and as a tool for awakening to address the present.
 

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Contents

Foreword
3
In The Beginning
23
Spanish
35
United States Colonialism
45
Neocolonialism
59
The Aftermath 7 3
73
Automaticity of Colonial Mentality 1 01
101
The Loss
127
Mental Health Implications
157
Colonial Mentality 1 57
179
Filipino American Decolonization
199
Postcolonial Psychological Research
223
Epilogue
253
References
269
Glossary Of Terms
303
Contributions
317

Colonial Mentality and
143

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About the author (2011)

E. J. R. David, Ph.D., was born in the Philippines by Kapampangan parents and was raised in Pasay, Las Pi?as, Makati, and Barrow, Alaska. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Alaska Anchorage in the Joint Ph.D. Program in Clinical-Community Psychology that has a Cultural and Indigenous Psychology emphasis. He has published in scientific journals regarding colonial mentality or internalized oppression and other topics related to ethnic minority psychology. He lives in Anchorage, Alaska with his wife, children, mother, brother, and countless relatives and friends.

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